Etymology
Advertisement
fane (n.)

"weathercock," late 14c., from Old English fana, fona "flag, banner," from Proto-Germanic *fanan- (source also of Old Frisian fana, Gothic fana "piece of cloth," Old High German fano, German Fahne "flag, standard"); possibly cognate with Latin pannus "piece of cloth" (see pane).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
fanfare (n.)
c. 1600, "a flourish sounded on a trumpet or bugle," from French fanfare "a sounding of trumpets" (16c.), from fanfarer "blow a fanfare" (16c.), perhaps echoic, or perhaps borrowed (with Spanish fanfarron "braggart," and Italian fanfano "babbler") from Arabic farfar "chatterer," of imitative origin. French fanfaron also came into English 1670s with a sense "boastful."
Related entries & more 
fang (n.)

Old English fang "prey, spoils, plunder, booty; a seizing or taking," from gefangen, strong past participle of fon "seize, take, capture," from Proto-Germanic *fāhanan (source also of Old Frisian fangia, Middle Dutch and Dutch vangen, Old Norse fanga, German fangen, Gothic fahan), from nasalized form of PIE root *pag- "to fasten" (source also of Latin pax "peace").

The sense of "canine tooth" (1550s) was not in Middle English and probably developed from Old English fengtoð, literally "catching- or grasping-tooth." Compare German Fangzahn. Transferred to the venom tooth of a serpent, etc., by 1800.

Related entries & more 
fangled (adj.)
1580s, "new-made," with implications of "foppish," from fangle (n.) "a new fancy, a novelty," based on newfangle "fond of novelty" (see newfangled).
Related entries & more 
Fannie Mae (n.)
1948, from FNMA, acronym of "Federal National Mortgage Association," established 1938.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
fanny (n.)
"buttocks," 1920, American English, from earlier British meaning "vulva" (1879), perhaps from the name of John Cleland's heroine in the scandalous novel "Fanny Hill or Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure" (1748). The fem. proper name is a diminutive of Frances. The genital sense is still the primary one outside U.S., but is not current in American English, a difference which can have consequences when U.S. TV programs and movies air in Britain.
Related entries & more 
fantail (n.)
1728, "a tail shaped like a fan," from fan (n.1) + tail (n.1). Specifically of birds from 1848.
Related entries & more 
fantasia (n.)
"musical composition that sounds extemporaneous," 1724, from Italian fantasia, from Latin phantasia (see fantasy).
Related entries & more 
fantasise (v.)
artificial British English spelling of fantasize, not much attested before 1970s. For suffix, see -ize. Related: Fantasised; fantasising.
Related entries & more 

Page 20