Etymology
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extremity (n.)
late 14c., "one of two things at the extreme ends of a scale," from Old French estremite (13c.), from Latin extremitatem (nominative extremitas) "the end of a thing," from extremus "outermost;" see extreme (adj.), the etymological sense of which is better preserved in this word. Meaning "utmost point or end" is from c. 1400; meaning "limb or organ of locomotion, appendage" is from early 15c. (compare extremities). Meaning "highest degree" of anything is early 15c. Related: Extremital.
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extremities (n.)
early 15c., "hands and feet, uttermost parts of the body," plural of extremity. Meaning "a person's last moments" is from c. 1600.
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emarginate (adj.)

"having the margin or extremity notched," 1731 (implied in emarginated), from Latin emarginatus, past participle of emarginare, from assimilated form of ex- (see ex-) + margo "edge, brink, border, margin" (from PIE root *merg- "boundary, border"). Related: Emargination.

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tip (n.1)
c. 1400, "extreme end of something, top of something round or pointed, metal attachment to the end of something," from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch tip "utmost point, extremity, tip" (compare German zipfel, a diminutive formation); or from a Scandinavian source (compare Old Norse typpi).
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ergot (n.)
fungal disease of rye and other grasses, 1680s, from French ergot "ergot," also "a spur, the extremity of a dead branch," from Old French argot "cock's spur" (12c.), which is of unknown origin. The blight so called from the shape the fungus forms on the diseased grain. Related: Ergotic. An alkaloid from the fungus, ergotamine (1921) is used to treat migraines.
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Akron 
city in Ohio, founded 1825, from Greek akron "extremity, highest point, mountain peak, headland," neuter of akros "at the furthest point" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce"). So called for its position on high ground at the confluence of two rivers.
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Dan (2)

name of one of the 12 tribes of ancient Israel or its territory, named for its founder; literally "he who judges," related to Hebrew din "to judge." In the Old Testament, it occupied the northernmost part of Israel, hence its use proverbially for "utmost extremity," as in from Dan to Beersheba (the southernmost region), 1738. Related: Danite.

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acromegaly (n.)
"gigantism due to activity of pituitary after normal growth has ceased," 1886, from French acromégalie, from medical Latin acromegalia, from Greek akron "extremity, highest point, mountain peak, headland," neuter of akros "at the furthest point" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce") + megas "great" (fem. megale; from PIE root *meg- "great"). Said in contemporary literature to have been coined 1885 by French physician Dr. Pierre Marie.
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finish (v.)
late 14c., "to bring to an end;" mid-15c., "to come to an end" (intransitive), from Old French finiss-, present participle stem of fenir "stop, finish, come to an end; die" (13c.), from Latin finire "to limit, set bounds; put an end to; come to an end," from finis "that which divides, a boundary, border," figuratively "a limit, an end, close, conclusion; an extremity, highest point; greatest degree," which is of unknown origin, perhaps related to figere "to fasten, fix" (see fix (v.)). Meaning "to kill, terminate the existence of" is from 1755.
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