Etymology
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expose (v.)

early 15c., "to leave without shelter or defense," from Old French esposer, exposer "lay open, set forth, speak one's mind, explain" (13c.), from Latin exponere "set forth, lay open, exhibit, reveal, publish," from ex "from, forth" (see ex-) + ponere "to put, place" (see position (n.)). Altered in French by confusion with poser "to place, lay down" (see pose (v.1)). Meaning "to exhibit openly" is from 1620s; that of "to unmask" is from 1690s. Photographic sense is from 1839. Related: Exposed; exposes; exposing.

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expose (n.)
also exposé, "display of discreditable information," 1803, initially as a French word; noun use of past participle of French exposer "lay open" (see expose (v.)). Earliest use was in reference to Napoleon.
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underexposed (adj.)
1861, in photography, from under + past participle of expose (v.).
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overexpose (v.)

also over-expose, 1869, in photography, "to expose (a plate) to light for too long," from over- + expose (v.). Related: Overexposed; overexposing.

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exposure (n.)
c. 1600, "public exhibition," from expose (v.) + -ure. Sense of "situation with regard to sun or weather" is from 1660s. Photographic sense "act of exposing to light" is from 1839. Indecent exposure attested by 1825.
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appose (v.)
"to apply" (one thing to another), 1590s, either from French apposer (from a "to;" see ad-, + poser "to place;" see pose (v.1)), or else formed in English from Latin apponere "lay beside, set near; put upon, apply" (see apposite) on analogy of compose, expose, etc. In Middle English, an identical word was a variant spelling of oppose. Related: Apposed; apposing.
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compose (v.)

c. 1400, compousen, "to write" (a book), from Old French composer "put together, compound; adjust, arrange; write" a work (12c.), from com- "with, together" (see com-) + poser "to place," from Late Latin pausare "to cease, lay down" (see pause (n.)).

Meaning influenced in Old French by componere "to arrange, direct" (see composite; also see compound (v.), pose (v.)), which gradually was replaced in French by composer. Similar confusion is found in expose, oppose, repose (v.2), transpose, etc.

Meaning "to make or form by uniting two or more things" is from late 15c. Sense of "be the substance or elements of, make up" is from 1540s. Sense of "invent and put (music) into proper form" is from 1590s. From c. 1600 as "bring into a composed state, to cal, quiet;" from 1650s as "place (parts or elements) in proper form, arrange."

In painting, "combine into an arrangement with artistic effect" (1782). In printing, "put into type" (1630s), but the usual term among printers was set. Related: Composed; composing. The printers' composing room is from 1737.

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insolate (v.)
"expose to the rays of the sun," 1620s, from Latin insolatus, past participle of insolare "place in the sun, expose to the sun," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + sol "sun" (from PIE root *sawel- "the sun"). Related: Insolated; insolating.
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air (v.)
1520s, "expose to open air," 1520s, from air (n.1). Figurative sense of "expose ostentatiously, make public" is from 1610s of objects, 1862 of opinions, grievances, etc. Meaning "to broadcast" (originally on radio) is from 1933. Related: Aired; airing.
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detect (v.)

early 15c., "uncover, lay bare, expose, disclose, reveal," a sense now obsolete, from Latin detectus, past participle of detegere "uncover, expose," figuratively "discover, reveal, disclose," from de "un-, off" (see de-) + tegere "to cover," from PIE root *(s)teg- "to cover."

Sense of "to find out the secret action or character of" is from 1580s. Meaning "discover, find out, ascertain" is from 1756. Related: Detected; detecting.

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