Etymology
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experience (n.)
Origin and meaning of experience

late 14c., "observation as the source of knowledge; actual observation; an event which has affected one," from Old French esperience "experiment, proof, experience" (13c.), from Latin experientia "a trial, proof, experiment; knowledge gained by repeated trials," from experientem (nominative experiens) "experienced, enterprising, active, industrious," present participle of experiri "to try, test," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + peritus "experienced, tested," from PIE *per-yo-, suffixed form of root *per- (3) "to try, risk." Meaning "state of having done something and gotten handy at it" is from late 15c.

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experience (v.)

1530s, "to test, try, learn by practical trial or proof;" see experience (n.). Sense of "feel, undergo" first recorded 1580s. Related: Experienced; experiences; experiencing.

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re-experience (v.)

also reexperience, "experience again or anew," 1789, from re- "back, again" + experience (v.). Related: Re-experienced; re-experiencing.

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experienced (adj.)

"having experience, taught by practice, skillful through doing," 1570s, past-participle adjective from experience (v.).

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unexperienced (adj.)

1560s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of experience (v.).

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experiential (adj.)

"relating to or having experience, derived from experience, empirical," 1640s (implied in experientially), from Latin experientia "knowledge gained by testing or trials" (see experience (n.)) + -al (1).

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inexperience (n.)

1590s, from French inexpérience (15c.) or directly from Late Latin inexperientia "inexperience," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + Latin experientia "experimental knowledge; experiment; effort" (see experience (n.)).

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empirical (adj.)

1560s, originally in medicine, "pertaining to or derived from experience or experiments," from Latin empiricus (n.) "a physician guided by experience," from Greek empeirikos "experienced," from empeiria "experience; mere experience or practice without knowledge," especially in medicine, from empeiros "experienced (in a thing), proven by use," from assimilated form of en "in" (see en- (2)) + peira "trial, experiment," from PIE *per-ya-, suffixed form of root *per- (3) "to try, risk." With -al (1). In a general sense of "guided by mere experience" from 1757. Related: Empirically (1640s as "by means of observation and experiment").

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empiric (adj.)

"pertaining to or derived from experience or experiments," c. 1600, from Latin empiricus (n.) "a physician guided by experience," from Greek empeirikos "experienced," from empeiria "experience; mere experience or practice without knowledge," especially in medicine, from empeiros "experienced (in a thing), proven by use," from assimilated form of en "in" (see en- (2)) + peira "trial, experiment," from PIE *per-ya-, suffixed form of root *per- (3) "to try, risk." Originally a school of ancient physicians who based their practice on experience rather than theory. Earlier in English as a noun (1540s) in reference to the sect, and earliest (1520s) in a sense "quack doctor" which was in frequent use 16c.-19c.

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misbetide (v.)

"have bad fortune, experience defeat," c. 1400, from mis- (1) + betide. Now obsolete.

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