Etymology
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expel (v.)
late 14c., "cast out," from Latin expellere "drive out, drive away," from ex "out" (see ex-) + pellere "to drive" (from PIE root *pel- (5) "to thrust, strike, drive"). Specific meaning "to eject from a school" is first recorded 1640s. Related: Expelled; expelling.
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expulsion (n.)

c. 1400, expulsioun, in medicine, "act of expelling matter from the body," from Old French expulsion or directly from Latin expulsionem (nominative expulsio), noun of action from past-participle stem of expellere "drive out" (see expel). From late 15c. as "forcible ejection, compulsory dismissal, banishment" as from a school or club.

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*pel- (5)
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to thrust, strike, drive."

It forms all or part of: anvil; appeal; catapult; compel; dispel; expel; felt (n.) "unwoven fabric matted together by rolling or beating;" filter; filtrate; impel; impulse; interpellation; interpolate; peal; pelt (v.) "to strike (with something);" polish; propel; pulsate; pulsation; pulse (n.1) "a throb, a beat;" push; rappel; repeal; repel; repousse.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek pallein "to wield, brandish, swing," pelemizein "to shake, cause to tremble;" Latin pellere "to push, drive;" Old Church Slavonic plŭstĭ.
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disbar (v.)

"deprive of the privileges of a barrister, expel from the bar," 1630s; see dis- + bar (n.3) in the legal sense. Related: Disbarred; disbarring; disbarment.

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eliminate (v.)

1560s, "to thrust out, remove, throw out of doors," from Latin eliminatus, past participle of eliminare "thrust out of doors, expel," from ex limine "off the threshold," from ex "off, out" (see ex-) + limine, ablative of limen "threshold" (see limit (n.)).

Used literally at first; the sense of "exclude, throw aside, or disregard as undesirable or unnecessary" is attested by 1714; the sense of "expel waste from the body" is by c. 1795. Related: Eliminated; eliminating; eliminative; eliminatory.

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xenelasia (n.)
"prevention of aliens from settling in Sparta," Greek, literally "expulsion of foreigners," from xenelatein "to expel foreigners," from xenos "stranger" (see xeno-) + elatos, verbal adjective of elaunein "drive, drive away, beat out."
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puddle (v.)

mid-15c., "to dabble in water, poke in mud," from puddle (n.); the extended sense in iron manufacture is "turn and stir (molten iron) in a furnace (to expel oxygen and carbon)." Related: Puddled; puddling.

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evict (v.)

mid-15c., "recover (property) by judicial means," from Latin evictus, past participle of evincere "overcome and expel, conquer, subdue, vanquish; prevail over; supplant," from assimilated form of ex "out," or perhaps here merely intensive (see ex-) + vincere "conquer" (from nasalized form of PIE root *weik- (3) "to fight, conquer"). Sense of "expel by legal process" first recorded in English 1530s, from a post-classical sense of the Latin word. Related: Evicted; evicting. Compare evince.

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extrude (v.)

of things, "to thrust out; force, press, or crowd out; expel," 1560s, from Latin extrudere "to thrust out, drive away," from ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + trudere "to thrust, push," from PIE *treud- "to press, push, squeeze" (see threat). Related: Extruded; extruding.

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