Etymology
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event (n.)

1570s, "the consequence of anything" (as in in the event that); 1580s, "that which happens;" from French event, from Latin eventus "occurrence, accident, event, fortune, fate, lot, issue," from past participle stem of evenire "to come out, happen, result," from assimilated form of ex- "out" (see ex-) + venire "to come" (from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come"). Meaning "a contest or single proceeding in a public sport" is from 1865. Events as "the course of events" is attested from 1842. Event horizon in astrophysics is from 1969.

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non-event (n.)

1957, "event that never happened;" 1958, "event that happened but fell so far short of expectations it might as well not have happened; unimportant or disappointing event;" from non- + event.

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eventuate (v.)
1788, American English, from Latin eventus, past participle of eventire (see event). Related: Eventuated; eventuating.
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eventual (adj.)
1610s, "pertaining to events," from French éventuel, from Latin event-, stem of evenire "to come out, happen, result" (see event). Meaning "ultimately resulting" is by 1823.
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eventful (adj.)
c. 1600, from event + -ful. According to OED, it is in Shakespeare, once ("As You Like It"), and there is no record of it between then and Johnson's "Dictionary." Related: Eventfully; eventfulness. Eventless is attested from 1815.
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prelim (n.)
1891, short for preliminary (race, test, event, etc.).
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raincheck (n.)

also rain-check, rain check, "ticket given to a spectator at an outdoor event for admission at a later date, or refund, should the event be interrupted by rain," 1884; see rain (n.) + check (n.1). Originally of tickets to rained-out baseball games.

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parabole (n.)

in rhetoric, "comparison, metaphor," according to Century Dictionary, "especially a formal simile, as in poetry or poetic prose, taken from a present or imagined object or event: distinguished from a paradigm, or comparison with a real past event," 1580s, from Greek parabolē "comparison" (see parable).

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programmer (n.)
1890, "event planner," agent noun from program (v.). Meaning "person who programs computers" is attested from 1948.
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narrative (n.)

"a tale, a story, a connected account of the particulars of an event or series of incidents," 1560s, from French narrative and from narrative (adj.).

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