Etymology
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Eucharist (n.)

"sacrament of the Lord's Supper, the Communion," mid-14c., from Old French eucariste, from Late Latin eucharistia, from Greek eukharistia "thanksgiving, gratitude," later "the Lord's Supper," from eukharistos "grateful," from eu "well" (see eu-) + stem of kharizesthai "show favor," from kharis "favor, grace," from PIE root *gher- (2) "to like, want." Eukharisteo is the usual verb for "to thank, to be thankful" in Septuagint and Greek New Testament. Related: Eucharistic.

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Aquarian (adj.)
"pertaining to the zodiacal sign of Aquarius," 1940 in reference to the astrological Age of Aquarius (see Aquarius + -ian). Earlier, "one who uses water instead of wine at the Eucharist" (1580s).
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Zwinglian (adj.)
1532, after Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531), Swiss Protestant reformer who revolted from the Roman communion in 1516 but who differed from Luther on theological points relating to the real presence in the Eucharist.
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paten (n.)

"plate for bread at Eucharist," c. 1300, from Old French patene and directly from Medieval Latin patena, from Latin patina "pan; broad, shallow dish," from Greek patane "plate, dish" (from PIE root *pete- "to spread").

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transubstantiation (n.)

late 14c., "change of one substance to another," from Medieval Latin trans(s)ubstantiationem (nominative trans(s)ubstantio), noun of action from past participle stem of trans(s)ubstantiare "to change from one substance into another," from Latin trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + substantiare "to substantiate," from substania "substance" (see substance). Ecclesiastical sense in reference to the Eucharist first recorded 1530s.

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Sanctus (n.)

late 14c., Latin, initial word of the "angelic hymn" (Isaiah vi.3) concluding the preface of the Eucharist and during which a bell is rung, literally "holy" (see saint (n.)). It renders Hebrew qadhosh in the hymn of adoration.

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celebrant (n.)

"one who celebrates" in any sense, 1731, from French célébrant "officiating clergyman" (in celebrating the eucharist) or directly from Latin celebrantem (nominative celebrans), present participle of celebrare "assemble together; sing the praises of; practice often" (see celebrate).

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concomitance (n.)

"a being together or in connection with another," 1530s, from French concomitance or directly from Medieval Latin concomitantia, from Late Latin concomitantem (see concomitant). In theology, "the coexistence of the blood and body of Christ in the bread of the Eucharist." Related: Concomitancy.

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viaticum (n.)
1560s, from Latin viaticum "traveling money; provision for a journey," noun use of neuter of adjective viaticus, from via "way" (see via). In Late Latin also "money to pay the expenses of one studying abroad," and in Church Latin, "the eucharist given to a dying person."
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communion (n.)

late 14c., communioun, "participation in something; that which is common to all; union in religious worship, doctrine, or discipline," from Old French comunion "community, communion" (12c.), from Latin communionem (nominative communio) "fellowship, mutual participation, a sharing," used in Late Latin ecclesiastical language for "participation in the sacrament," from communis "common, general" (see common (adj.)).

Used by Augustine, in belief that the word was derived from com- "with, together" + unus "oneness, union." In English, from mid-15c. as "the sacrament of the Eucharist," from c. 1500 as "act of partaking in the sacrament of the Eucharist." From 1610s as "intercourse between two or more."

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