Etymology
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Etruscan (n.)

1706, from Latin Etruscus "an Etruscan," from Etruria, ancient name of Tuscany (see Tuscan); of uncertain origin but containing an element that might mean "water" (see Basque) and which could be a reference to the rivers in the region.

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Tuscan (n.)
late 14c., from Italian Toscano, from Late Latin Tuscanus "belonging to the Tusci," a people of ancient Italy, from Tuscus, earlier *Truscus, shortened form of Etruscus (see Etruscan).
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Sergius 
masc. proper name, from Latin, of Etruscan origin.
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laburnum (n.)
small, leguminous tree native to the Alps, 1570s, from Latin laburnum (Pliny), a word of unknown origin; perhaps from Etruscan.
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Pisa 
Italian city, from Etruscan, of uncertain meaning. Related: Pisan.
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ferro- 
before vowels ferr-, word-forming element indicating the presence of or derivation from iron, from Latin ferro-, combining form of ferrum "iron," which is of unknown origin. Possibly of Semitic origin, via Etruscan [Klein]; Watkins suggests "possibly borrowed (via Etruscan) from the same obscure source as OE bræs "brass." Also sometimes especially indicative of the presence of iron in the ferrous state; ferri- indicating iron in the ferric state.
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fovea (n.)
"depression or shallow pit in a surface," 1849, Latin, literally "small pit," related to favissae "underground reservoirs;" which is of unknown origin, perhaps from Etruscan. Related: Foveal; foveated.
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Camilla 
fem. proper name, from Latin, fem. of Camillus, cognomen of several members of the gens Furia, from camillus "noble youth attending at sacrifices," a word perhaps from Etruscan.
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viburnum (n.)
genus of shrubs widespread in Eurasia and North America, the wayfaring-tree, 1731, from Latin viburnum, which is said to be probably an Etruscan word.
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ceremony (n.)

late 14c., cerymonye, "a religious observance, a solemn rite," from Old French ceremonie and directly from Medieval Latin ceremonia, from Latin caerimonia "holiness, sacredness; awe; reverent rite, sacred ceremony," an obscure word, possibly of Etruscan origin, or a reference to the ancient rites performed by the Etruscan pontiffs at Caere, near Rome.

Introduced in English by Wyclif. Also from late 14c. as "a conventional usage of politeness, formality." Disparaging sense of "mere formality" is by 1550s.

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