Etymology
Advertisement
et cetera 

also etcetera, early 15c., from Latin et cetera, literally "and the others," from et "and" + neuter plural of ceterus "the other, other part, that which remains," from Proto-Italic *ke-etero‑, from *ke-, variant form of PIE root *ko-, the stem of demonstrative pronoun meaning "this" + *etero‑ "other (of two), again, a second time, again," a PIE adjective of comparison.

The common form of the abbreviation before 20c. was &c., but etc. now prevails.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
et al. 
also et al, 1883, abbreviation of Latin et alii (masc.), et aliæ (fem.), or et alia (neuter), in any case meaning "and others."
Related entries & more 
hic et nunc 
Latin, literally "here and now," from demonstrative pronominal adjective of place hic "this, here" + nunc "now" (see now).
Related entries & more 
panem et circenses 

Latin, literally "bread and circuses," supposedly coined by Juvenal and describing the cynical formula of the Roman emperors for keeping the masses content with ample food and entertainment.

Duas tantum res anxius optat, Panem et circenses [Juvenal, Sat. x.80].
Related entries & more 
in medias res 

Latin, literally "in the midst of things," from medias, accusative fem. plural of medius "middle" (see medial (adj.)) + accusative plural of res "a thing" (see re). From Horace, in reference to narrative technique:

Semper ad eventum festinat, et in medias res,
Non secus ac notas auditorem rapit (etc.)
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
art deco (n.)

decorative and architectural style popular from 1925-1940, the name attested from 1966, from shortening of French art décoratif, literally "decorative art" (see decorative); the French phrase is from the title of L'Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, held in Paris in 1925.

Related entries & more 
ivory tower (n.)

symbol of artistic or intellectual aloofness, by 1889, from French tour d'ivoire, used in 1837 by critic Charles-Augustin Sainte-Beuve (1804-1869) with reference to the poet Alfred de Vigny (1797-1863), whom he accused of excessive aloofness.

Et Vigny, plus secret, comme en sa tour d'ivoire, avant midi rentrait. [Sainte-Beuve, "Pensées d'Août, à M. Villemain," 1837]

Used earlier as a type of a wonder or a symbol of "the ideal." The literal image is perhaps from Song of Solomon [vii:4]:

Thy neck is as a tower of ivory; thine eyes like the fishpools in Heshbon, by the gate of Bathrabbim: thy nose is as the tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus. [KJV]
Related entries & more