Etymology
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sect (n.)
mid-14c., "distinctive system of beliefs or observances; party or school within a religion," from Old French secte, sete "sect, religious community," or directly from Late Latin secta "religious group, sect in philosophy or religion," from Latin secta "manner, mode, following, school of thought," literally "a way, road, beaten path," from fem. of sectus, variant past participle of sequi "follow," from PIE root *sekw- (1) "to follow." Confused in this sense with Latin secta, fem. past participle of secare "to cut" (from PIE root *sek- "to cut"). Meaning "separately organized religious body" is recorded from 1570s.
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establish (v.)
late 14c., from Old French establiss-, present participle stem of establir "cause to stand still, establish, stipulate, set up, erect, build" (12c., Modern French établir), from Latin stabilire "make stable," from stabilis "stable" (see stable (adj.)). For the unetymological e-, see e-. Related: Established; establishing. An established church or religion is one sanctioned by the state.
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re-establish (v.)

also reestablish, "set up again or anew," late 15c. (Caxton); from re- "back, again" + establish. Related: Re-established; re-establishing; re-establishment.

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sectary (n.)
"member or adherent of a sect," 1550s, from French sectaire or directly from Medieval Latin sectarius, from secta (see sect).
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Druse 

also Druze, one of a people and Muslim sect centered in the mountains of Lebanon, 1786, from Arabic duruz, plural of darazi, from name of the sect founder, Ismail ad-Darazi (11c.), literally "Ismail the Tailor."

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non-sectarian (adj.)

also nonsectarian, "not involving or relating to a specific religious sect," 1825, from non- + sectarian.

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locate (v.)
1650s, intransitive, "establish oneself in a place, settle, adopt a fixed residence," from Latin locatus, past participle of locare "to place, put, set, dispose, arrange," from locus "a place" (see locus).

Transitive sense of "to fix (something) in a place, settle or establish (something) in a particular spot" is from 1739, American English, originally of land surveys. And via the notion of "mark the limits of" (a parcel of land) the sense of the verb extended to "establish (something) in a place" (1807) and "find out the exact place of" (1882, American English). Related: Located; locating.
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Hutterite (n.)
1640s in reference to Moravian Anabaptist sect established by Jacob Hutter (d. 1536) + -ite (1).
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Schwenkfeldian 
1560s, from Casper Schwenkfeld (1490-1561), Silesian Protestant mystic who founded the sect. Schwenkfelder is attested from 1882.
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Ismailite (n.)
also Ismaelite, 1570s, in reference to a Shi'ite Muslim sect, from Arabic Isma'iliy, the name of the sect that after 765 C.E. followed the Imamship through descendants of Ismail (Arabic for Ishmael), deceased eldest son of Jafar, the sixth Imam, rather than his surviving younger son.
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