Etymology
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espresso (n.)
coffee made under steam pressure, 1945, from Italian (caffe) espresso, from espresso "pressed out," past participle of esprimere, from Latin exprimere "press out, squeeze out" (see express (v.1)). In reference to the steam pressure.
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*per- (4)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to strike," an extended sense from root *per- (1) "forward, through."

It forms all or part of: compress; depress; espresso; express; impress (v.1) "have a strong effect on the mind or heart;" imprimatur; imprint; oppress; oppression; pregnant (adj.2) "convincing, weighty, pithy;" press (v.1) "push against;" pressure; print; repress; reprimand; suppress.

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affogato (n.)

"hot espresso poured over vanilla ice cream and served as a dessert," by 1999, from Italian affogato, literally "drowned" (from the point of view of the ice cream).

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latte (n.)

"espresso coffee with milk," by 1990, short for caffè latte, which is an Italian expression meaning "milk coffee," from Latin lac (genitive lactis) "milk" (from PIE root *g(a)lag- "milk"). Compare cafe au lait.

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cappuccino (n.)
"espresso coffee with steamed milk foam," 1948, from Italian cappuccino, from Capuchin in reference to the beverage's color, which supposedly resembles to that of the brown hoods of the Friars Minor Capuchins (see Capuchin).
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Americano (n.)

"cup of weak or diluted coffee," especially espresso, short for café Americano (by 1964), from Spanish, literally "American coffee" (see American), a Central American term from the 1950s, a disparaging reference to the type of coffee believed to be favored in the United States.

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express (v.1)

late 14c., "represent in visual arts; put into words," from Old French espresser, expresser "press, squeeze out; speak one's mind" (Modern French exprimer), Medieval Latin expressare, frequentative of Latin exprimere "represent, describe, portray, imitate, translate," literally "to press out" (source also of Italian espresso); the sense evolution here perhaps is via an intermediary sense such as "clay, etc., that under pressure takes the form of an image," from ex "out" (see ex-) + pressare "to press, push," from Latin premere "to press, hold fast, cover, crowd, compress" (from PIE root *per- (4) "to strike"). Related: Expressed; expresses; expressing; expressible.

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