Etymology
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escape (v.)

c. 1300, transitive and intransitive, "free oneself from confinement; extricate oneself from trouble; get away safely by flight (from battle, an enemy, etc.)," from Old North French escaper, Old French eschaper (12c., Modern French échapper), from Vulgar Latin *excappare, literally "get out of one's cape, leave a pursuer with just one's cape," from Latin ex- "out of" (see ex-) + Late Latin cappa "mantle" (see cap (n.)). Mid-14c., of things, "get or keep out of a person's grasp, elude (notice, perception, attention, etc.);" late 14c. as "avoid experiencing or suffering (something), avoid physical contact with; avoid (a consequence)." Formerly sometimes partly anglicized as outscape (c. 1500). Related: Escaped; escaping.

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escape (n.)
c. 1400, "an act of escaping, action of escaping," also "a possibility of escape," from escape (v.) or from Old French eschap; earlier eschap (c. 1300). Mental/emotional sense is from 1853. From 1810 as "a means of escape." The contractual escape clause recorded by 1939.
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escapee (n.)
"escaped prisoner or convict," 1865, American English, from escape (v.) + -ee.
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escapism (n.)
1933, American English, from escape (n.) in the mental/emotional sense + -ism.
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escapologist (n.)
performer who specializes in getting out of confinement, 1926; see escape + -ologist. Related: Escapology.
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escapement (n.)
in watch- and clock-making, 1779 (from 1755 as scapement), based on French échappement (1716 in this sense); see escape (v.) + -ment.
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escapist 

in the figurative sense, 1930 (adj.); 1933 (n.), from escape + -ist. By 1881 in a literal sense.

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inescapable (adj.)
1792, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + escapable (see escape (v.)). Related: Inescapably.
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scape (v.)
late 13c., shortened form of escape; frequent in prose till late 17c. Related: Scaped (sometimes 15c.-16c. with strong past tense scope); scaping. As a noun from c. 1300.
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