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error (n.)
also, through 18c., errour; c. 1300, "a deviation from truth made through ignorance or inadvertence, a mistake," also "offense against morality or justice; transgression, wrong-doing, sin;" from Old French error "mistake, flaw, defect, heresy," from Latin errorem (nominative error) "a wandering, straying, a going astray; meandering; doubt, uncertainty;" also "a figurative going astray, mistake," from errare "to wander; to err" (see err). From early 14c. as "state of believing or practicing what is false or heretical; false opinion or belief, heresy." From late 14c. as "deviation from what is normal; abnormality, aberration." From 1726 as "difference between observed value and true value."

Words for "error" in most Indo-European languages originally meant "wander, go astray" (for example Greek plane in the New Testament, Old Norse villa, Lithuanian klaida, Sanskrit bhrama-), but Irish has dearmad "error," from dermat "a forgetting."
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misprint (v.)

"make an error in printing (something)," late 15c.; from mis- (1) + print (v.). Related: misprinted; misprinting. The noun, "an error made in printing," is attested by 1745.

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heterodoxy (n.)
1650s, from Greek heterodoxia "error of opinion," from heterodoxos (see heterodox).
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despatch 
18c. variant of dispatch (q.v.), apparently the result of an error in the printing of Johnson's dictionary.
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expediate (v.)
a 17c. error for expedite that has gotten into the dictionaries.
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infallibility (n.)
"quality of being incapable of error," 1610s, from Medieval Latin infallibilitas, from infallibilis (see infallible).
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culpable (adj.)

"deserving censure, blameworthy," late 13c., coupable, from Old French coupable (12c., Modern French coupable), from Latin culpabilis "worthy of blame," from culpare "to blame," from culpa "crime, fault, blame, guilt, error." De Vaan writes that this might be from a PIE root *kuolp- "to bend, turn" (source also of Greek kolpos "bosom, lap;" see gulf (n.)). According to his sources, "The original meaning of culpa is 'a state of error' rather than 'an error committed'." English (and for a time French) restored the first Latin -l- in later Middle Ages. Related: Culpably; culpableness.

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typo (n.)
1816, "compositor," short for typographer; 1892 as short for typographical error.
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enumerable (adj.)

"capable of being enumerated," 1846; see enumerate + -able. Often an error for innumerable.

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