Etymology
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enzyme (n.)

1881, as a biochemical term, from German Enzym, coined 1878 by German physiologist Wilhelm Kühne (1837-1900), from Modern Greek enzymos "leavened," from en "in" (see en- (2)) + zymē "leaven" (see zymurgy). Related: Enzymotic.

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lysozyme 
type of immune-system enzyme found in tears, saliva, egg-whites, etc., 1922, named by its discoverer, Alexander Fleming (six years before he discovered penicillin), who coined it from lyso- "loosening, dissolving" + suffix from enzyme. So called because it attack bacteria cell walls.
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protease (n.)

type of enzyme, 1898, from protein + -ase. Related: Proteolysis.

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polymerase (n.)

"enzyme which catalyzes the formation of a polymer," 1866, coined by Berzelius (1830) from polymer + -ase.

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rennin (n.)

milk-curdling enzyme, 1897, from rennet (n.1) + -in (2).

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renin (n.)
enzyme found in kidneys, 1894, from German Renin, from Latin renes "kidneys" (see renal) + -in (2).
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lipase (n.)
class of enzymes, 1897, from French lipase (1896), from Greek lipos "fat" (see lipo-) + chemical enzyme ending -ase.
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amylase (n.)
enzyme which brings about the hydrolysis of starch, 1885, from amyl + chemical suffix -ase.
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luciferase (n.)
enzyme found in fireflies and other glowing creatures, 1888, from French luciférase; see Lucifer. Related: Luciferin.
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retrovirus (n.)

1977, earlier retravirus (1974), from re(verse) tra(nscriptase) + connective -o- + virus. So called because it contains reverse transcriptase, an enzyme that uses RNA instead of DNA to encode genetic information, which reverses the usual pattern. Remodeled by influence of retro- "backwards."

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