Etymology
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environmental (adj.)

1887, "environing, surrounding," from environment + -al (1). Ecological sense by 1967. Related: Environmentally (1884).

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sociology (n.)

the science of social phenomena, 1842, from French sociologie, a hybrid coined 1830 by French philosopher Isidore Auguste Comte (1798-1857), from Latin socius "associate" (see social (adj.)) + Greek-derived suffix -logie (see -logy).

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sociological (adj.)

1861; see sociology + -ical. Related: Sociologically.

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greens (n.)

c. 1400, "vegetables;" 1690s, "freshly cut branches used for decoration," from green (n.). Meaning "ecology political party" first recorded 1978, from German die Grünen (West Germany), an outgrowth of Grüne Aktion Zukunft "Green Campaign for the Future," a mainly anti-nuclear power movement, and/or grüne Listen "green lists" (of environmental candidates). Green (adj.) in the sense of "environmental" is attested in English from 1971; Greenpeace, the international conservation and environmental protection group, is from 1971.

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matrifocal (adj.)

1952, in reference to families or households where the mother has responsibility and authority, a term from sociology, from matri- + focal.

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environmentalism (n.)

1923, as a psychological theory (in the nature vs. nurture debate), from environmental + -ism. The ecological sense is from 1972. Related: Environmentalist (n.), 1916 in the psychological sense, 1970 in the ecological sense.

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EPA 

initialism (acronym) for Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. federal agency proposed by President Richard Nixon and created in December 1970.

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dysfunction (n.)

"failure to function, abnormality or impairment of function," 1914, from dys- "bad, abnormal, difficult" + function (n.). Originally in anatomy and medicine; in sociology by 1949.

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bioethics (n.)

also bio-ethics, coined 1970 by U.S. biochemist Van Rensselaer Potter II, who defined it as "Biology combined with diverse humanistic knowledge forging a science that sets a system of medical and environmental priorities for acceptable survival." From bio- + ethics.

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