Advertisement
53 entries found.
Search filter: All Results 
entry (n.)
c. 1300, "act or fact of physically entering; place of entrance, means of entering a building; opportunity or right of entering; initiation or beginning of an action;" from Old French entree "entry, entrance" (12c.), noun use of fem. past participle of entrer "to enter" (see enter). Meaning "that which is entered or set down (in a book, list, etc.)" is from c. 1500.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
re-entry (n.)

also reentry, mid-15c., reentre, "act of entering again," from re- "again" + entry; probably on model of Old French rentree. Originally especially of the right to resume possession of lands or estates; specifically of spacecraft returning through the atmosphere from 1948. Re-entering as a noun is from 1630s; re-entrance (1901) was introduced as a technical term.

Related entries & more 
entryway (n.)

"passage or space for ingress, an entry," 1735, from entry + way.

Related entries & more 
entree (n.)
1724, "opening piece of an opera or ballet," from French entrée, from Old French entree (see entry). Cookery sense is from 1759; originally the dish which was introductory to the main course. Meaning "entry, freedom of access" is from 1762. The word had been borrowed in Middle English as entre "act of entering."
Related entries & more 
listing (n.)
"the placing of property with an agent to be catalogued for sale," 1906, verbal noun from list (v.3); meaning "an entry in a catalogue" is from 1962.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
housewarming (n.)
also house-warming, "celebration of the entry of a family into a new home," 1570s, from house (n.) + verbal noun from warm (v.).
Related entries & more 
q.v. 

abbreviation of the Latin phrase quod vide "which see," placed after a dictionary entry, book title, etc., to refer the reader to it for further information. From neuter of qui "who" + imperative singular of videre "to see."

Related entries & more 
expiate (v.)
c. 1600 (OED 2nd ed. print entry has a typographical error in the earliest date), from Latin expiatus, past participle of expiare "to make amends, atone for" (see expiation). Related: Expiable (1560s); expiated; expiating.
Related entries & more 
petroleur (n.)

"an incendiary," especially one of the adherents of the Commune who used petroleum to set fire to the public buildings of Paris upon the entry of the national troops, 1871, from French pétroleur, from petrole (see petrol). The fem. form is pétroleuse.

Related entries & more 
Gipsy 
alternative spelling of Gypsy. OED gives it precedence, and it is the main form for the word's entry in Century Dictionary, but Fowler writes that "the first y is highly significant, reminding us that Gypsy means Egyptian ...."
Related entries & more