Etymology
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benefits (n.)
"financial support (especially for medical expenses) to which one is entitled through employment or membership," 1895, plural of benefit (n.).
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presumable (adj.)

"capable of being taken for granted, entitled to belief without examination or direct evidence," 1690s, from presume + -able.

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sanjak (n.)

Ottoman administrative district, a subdivision of a vilayet, from Turkish sanjaq, literally "flag, banner." "So called because the governor is entitled to carry in war a standard of one horse-tail" [Century Dictionary]. Related: Sanjakate; sanjak-bey.

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payroll (n.)

also pay-roll, 1740, "a list of persons to be paid, with indication of the sums to which they are entitled," from pay (v.) + roll (n.). The meaning "total amount paid to employees over a period" is by 1898.

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due (n.)

early 15c., "that which is owed, what one deserves or is entitled to," from due (adj.), also compare dues. To give the devil his due "do justice to a person of supposed bad character" is from 1590s.  "Giue them their due though they were diuels" [1589]. 

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authoritative (adj.)
c. 1600, "dictatorial" (a sense now restricted to authoritarian), earlier auctoritative (implied in auctoritativeli "with official approval or sanction"), from Medieval Latin auctoritativus, from Latin auctoritatem (see authority). Meaning "having due authority, entitled to credence or obedience" is from 1650s; that of "proceeding from proper authority" is from 1809. Related: Authoritatively; authoritativeness.
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frank (v.)
"to free a letter for carriage or an article for publication, to send by public conveyance free of expense," 1708, from shortened form of French affranchir, from a- "to" + franchir "to free" (see franchise (v.)). A British parliamentary privilege from 1660-1840; in U.S. Congress, technically abolished 1873. Related: Franked; franking. As a noun, "signature of one entitled to send letters for free," from 1713.
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xeno- 
before vowels, xen-, word-forming element meaning "strange, foreign; stranger, foreigner," from Greek xenos "a guest, stranger, foreigner, refugee, guest-friend, one entitled to hospitality," cognate with Latin hostis, from PIE root *ghos-ti- "stranger, guest, host." "The term was politely used of any one whose name was unknown" [Liddell & Scott].
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merit (v.)

late 15c. (Caxton), "to be entitled to, be or become deserving of, earn a right or incur a liability," from French meriter (Modern French mériter), from merite (n.), or directly from Latin meritare "to earn, yield," frequentative of merere, mereri "to earn (money);" also "to earn pay as a soldier" (see merit (n.)). Related: Merited; meriting.

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demurrer (n.)

1530s, "a pause, a delay" (a sense now obsolete); 1540 as legal pleading to the effect that, even conceding the facts to be as alleged by the opponent, he is not entitled to legal relief, from Anglo-French demurrer, Old French demorer "to delay, retard," from Latin demorari "to linger, loiter, tarry," from de- (see de-) + morari "to delay," from mora "a pause, delay" (see moratorium). Transferred sense of "objection raised or exception taken" to anything is by 1590s.

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