Etymology
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entitle (v.)
also intitle, late 14c., "to give a title to a chapter, book, etc.," from Anglo-French entitler, Old French entiteler "entitle, call" (Modern French intituler), from Late Latin intitulare "give a title or name to," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + titulus "title" (see title (n.)).

Meaning "to bestow (on a person) a rank or office" is mid-15c. Sense of "to give (someone) 'title' to an estate or property," hence to give that person a claim to possession or privilege, is mid-15c.; this now is used mostly in reference to circumstances and actions. Related: Entitled; entitling.
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entitlement (n.)
1823, perhaps in some senses from French entitlement, which was in Old French as "title (of a book), inscription," and later was used in legal language; but also in part a native formation from entitle + -ment. Entitlement culture attested by 1994 (culture of entitlement is from 1989).
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ovation (n.)

1530s, in the Roman historical sense, from French ovation or directly from Latin ovationem (nominative ovatio) "a triumph, rejoicing," noun of action from past-participle stem of ovare "exult, rejoice, triumph," probably imitative of a shout (compare Greek euazein "to utter cries of joy").

In Roman history, a lesser triumph, granted to a commander for achievements (such as defeat of an inconsiderable enemy, accomplished with little bloodshed), insufficient to entitle him to a triumph proper. The figurative sense of "burst of enthusiastic applause from a crowd" is attested by 1831.

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