Etymology
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entail (v.)
mid-14c., "convert (an estate) into 'fee tail' (feudum talliatum)," from en- (1) "make" + taile "legal limitation," especially of inheritance, ruling who succeeds in ownership and preventing the property from being sold off, from Anglo-French taile, Old French taillie, past participle of taillier "allot, cut to shape," from Late Latin taliare "to split" (see tailor (n.)). Sense of "have consequences" is 1829, via the notion of "inseparable connection." Related: Entailed; entailling; entailment.
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intail (v.)
obsolete form of entail. Related: Intailed; intailing.
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tagliatelle (n.)
1876, from Italian tagliatelle, plural noun from tagliare "to cut" (see entail).
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tail (n.2)
"limitation of ownership," a legal term, early 14c. in Anglo-French; late 13c. in Anglo-Latin, in most cases a shortened form of entail.
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