Etymology
Advertisement
enjoyment (n.)
1550s, "state of enjoying," from enjoy + -ment. As "that which gives pleasure" from 1732.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pleasureless (adj.)

"devoid of pleasure, without enjoyment or satisfaction," 1814, from pleasure (n.) + -less.

Related entries & more 
pleasance (n.)

mid-14c., plesaunce, "the gratification or propitiation of God or some other deity;" late 14c., "satisfaction, enjoyment, delight; moral, spiritual, or intellectual satisfaction," from Old French plaisance "pleasure, delight, enjoyment," from plaisant "pleasant, pleasing, agreeable" (see pleasant).

Related entries & more 
usufruct (n.)
"right to the use and profits of the property of another without damaging it," 1610s (implied in usufructuary), from Late Latin usufructus, in full usus et fructus "use and enjoyment," from Latin usus "a use" (see use (n.)) + fructus "enjoyment," also "fruit" (from PIE root *bhrug- "to enjoy," with derivatives referring to agricultural products). Attested earlier in delatinized form usufruit (late 15c.).
Related entries & more 
pleasure (n.)

late 14c., plesire, "source of enjoyment, pleasing quality or thing, that which pleases or gratifies the senses or the mind," from Old French plesir, also plaisir "enjoyment, delight, desire, will" (12c.), from noun use of infinitive plaisir (v.) "to please," from Latin placere "to please, give pleasure, be approved" (see please (v.)).

Also from late 14c. as "discretion, will, desire, preference," as in at (one's) pleasure "when one wishes." From mid-15c. as "gratification; feeling of enjoyment, liking." The meaning "sensual gratification" is from early 15c. That of "indulgence of the appetites as the chief object of life" is attested from 1520s. The ending was altered in Middle English by influence of words in -ure (measure, etc.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
list (n.4)
c. 1200, "pleasure, enjoyment;" mid-13c., "desire, wish, will, choice," from list (v.4). Somehow English has lost listy (adj.) "pleasant, willing (to do something); ready, quick" (mid-15c.).
Related entries & more 
easement (n.)
late 14c., "compensation, redress," from Old French aisement "comfort, convenience; use, enjoyment," from aisier "to ease," from aise (see ease (n.)). The meaning "legal right or privilege of using something not one's own" is from early 15c.
Related entries & more 
voluptuary 
c. 1600 (noun and adjective), from French voluptuaire and directly from Latin voluptuarius, earlier voluptarius "of pleasure, giving enjoyment; devoted to pleasure, luxurious," from voluptas "pleasure" (see voluptuous).
Related entries & more 
zest (n.)
1670s, from French zeste "piece of orange or lemon peel used as a flavoring," of unknown origin. Sense of "thing that adds flavor" is 1709; that of "keen enjoyment" first attested 1791.
Related entries & more 
Terpsichore (n.)

the muse of the dance, Greek Terpsikhore, literally "enjoyment of dance," from terpein "to delight" (from PIE root *terp- "to satisfy;" source also of Sanskrit trpyati "takes one's fill," Lithuanian tarpstu, tarpti "to thrive, prosper") + khoros "dance, chorus" (see chorus).

Related entries & more