Etymology
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endure (v.)
late 14c., "to undergo or suffer" (especially without breaking); also "to continue in existence," from Old French endurer (12c.) "make hard, harden; bear, tolerate; keep up, maintain," from Latin indurare "make hard," in Late Latin "harden (the heart) against," from in- (from PIE root *en "in") + durare "to harden," from durus "hard," from PIE *dru-ro-, suffixed variant form of root *deru- "be firm, solid, steadfast."

Replaced the important Old English verb dreogan (past tense dreag, past participle drogen), which survives in dialectal dree. Related: Endured; endures.
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enduring (adj.)
"lasting," 1530s, present-participle adjective from endure.
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endurance (n.)
late 15c., "continued existence in time;" see endure + -ance. Meaning "ability to bear suffering, etc." is from 1660s.
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endurable (adj.)
c. 1600, "able to endure," from endure + -able, or from French endurable. Meaning "able to be endured" is from 1744. Related: Endurably.
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induration (n.)
late 14c., "a hardening or congealing" (of body parts, alchemical materials), from Old French induracion "hardness, obstinacy" (14c.) or directly from Medieval Latin indurationem (nominative induratio) "hardness (especially of the heart)," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin indurare "to make hard, harden" (see endure).
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sustain (v.)
c. 1300, "give support to," from stem of Old French sostenir "hold up, bear; suffer, endure" (13c.), from Latin sustinere "hold up, hold upright; furnish with means of support; bear, undergo, endure," from assimilated form of sub "up from below" (see sub-) + tenere "to hold," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch." Meaning "continue, keep up" (an action, etc.) is from early 14c. Sense of "endure without failing or yielding" is from c. 1400. Related: Sustained; sustaining.
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intolerant (adj.)
1735, "unable or unwilling to endure" (a condition, etc.), from Latin intolerantem (nominative intolerans) "not enduring, impatient, intolerant; intolerable," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + tolerans, present participle of tolerare "to bear, endure" (see toleration).

Meaning "not disposed to endure contrary opinions or beliefs, impatient of dissent or opposition" is from 1765. Of plants, with reference to deep shade, from 1898. The noun meaning "person or persons who do not favor toleration" is from 1765. Related: Intolerantly.
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forbear (v.)
"to abstain," Old English forberan "bear up against, control one's feelings, abstain from, refrain; tolerate, endure" (past tense forbær, past participle forboren), from for- + beran "to bear" (see bear (v.)). Related: Forbearer; forbearing; forbore. Of similar formation are Old High German ferberen, Gothic frabairan "to endure."
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immutability (n.)

1590s, from Latin immutabilitas "unchangeableness," from immutabilis "unchangeable" (see immutable).

Nought may endure but Mutability. [Shelley]
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dree (v.)

"to suffer, bear, endure," Old English dreogan "to work, suffer, endure" (see drudge (v.)). Phrase dree one's weird "abide one's fate or destiny" is from 14c. Perhaps from a tendency to be confused with draw, the verb faded from use but lingered in North of England and Scottish dialect and was revived as an archaism by Scott and his imitators.

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