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15 entries found.
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employee (n.)
"person employed," 1850, mainly in U.S. use, from employ + -ee. Formed on model of French employé.
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employe (n.)
"person employed," 1834, from French employé (fem. employée), noun use of past participle of employer (see employ).
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clock-watcher (n.)
"employee habitually prompt in leaving," 1887, from clock (n.1) + agent noun from watch (v.). Related: Clock-watching. Compare earlier tell-clock "idler" (c. 1600).
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temp (adj.)
1909, American English, shortened form of temporary (job, employee, etc.). As a noun by 1932; as a verb by 1973. Related: Temped; temping.
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paycheck (n.)

also pay-check, "paper check issued by an employer to pay an employee for labor or services," 1894, from pay (n.) + check (n.1).

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can (v.2)
"to put up in cans," 1860, from can (n.1), especially "to put up in a sealed container for preservation." Sense of "to fire an employee" is from 1905. Related: Canned; canning.
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Peter Principle (n.)

1968, "in a hierarchy, every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence," named for (and by) Laurence Johnston Peter (1919-1990) Canadian-born U.S. educationalist and author, who described it in his book of the same name (1969).

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emoji (n.)

pictorial character, by 2008, from Japanese e "picture" + moji "character" (compare kanji), coined 1999 in Japanese by Shigetaka Kurita, NTT DoCoMo employee. Its adoption in English was driven by Apple iPhone's inclusion of the feature in 2008. The similarity to native emoticon is a happy coincidence.

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layoff (n.)
also lay-off, lay off; 1889, "rest, relaxation, respite;" from the verbal phrase; see lay (v.) + off (adv.). Via seasonal labor with periodic inactivity, it came to have a sense of "temporary release from employment," and by 1960s was being used somewhat euphemistically for permanent releases of masses of workers by employers. The verbal phrase lay off is attested from 1841 (colloquial) as "stop working, be idle" (intransitive); 1892 as "dismiss" (an employee); meaning "stop disturbing" is from 1908. Its oldest sense is "remove and lay aside, rid oneself of" (1590s).
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wait (n.)
early 13c., "a watcher, onlooker," from Old North French wait (Old French gait "look-out, watch, sentry"), from Old North French waitier (Old French gaitier; see wait (v.)). Compare Old High German wahta, German Wacht "a watchman." From late 14c. as "an ambush, a trap" (as in lie in wait). From 1855 as "time occupied in waiting;" 1873 as "an act of waiting." From the sense "civic employee responsible for signaling the hour or an alarm by sounding on a trumpet, etc." comes the old sense "town musicians" (mid-15c.).
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