Etymology
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elect (v.)
early 15c., "to choose for an office, position, or duty," from Latin electus, past participle of eligere "to pick out, choose," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -ligere, combining form of legere "to choose," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather." Related: Elected; electing.
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elect (adj.)
early 15c., of action, "voluntary;" of persons, "taken in preference to others," especially "chosen by God for some special purpose," from Latin electus, past participle of eligere "to pick out, choose," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -ligere, combining form of legere "to choose," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather." The noun meaning "those chosen by God" is from early 15c.
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pre-elect (v.)

also preelect, "to choose or elect beforehand," 1560s, from pre- "before" + elect (v.). Related: Pre-elected; pre-electing.

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re-elect (v.)

also reelect, "elect again," c. 1600, from re- "back, again" + elect (v.). Related: Re-elected; re-electing. Re-election "election a second time to the same office" is attested by 1745.

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electable (adj.)
1758, "qualified for election;" see elect (v.) + -able. Meaning "capable of getting enough support to win an election" is by 1962. Related: Electability.
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lecture (n.)

c. 1300, "written works, literature;" late 14c., "learning from books," from Medieval Latin lectura "a reading," from Latin lectus, past participle of legere "to read," originally "to gather, collect, pick out, choose" (compare elect), from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')." Thus to read is, perhaps, etymologically, to "pick out words."

The sense of "a reading aloud, action of reading aloud" (either in divine worship or to students) in English emerged early 15c. That of "a discourse on a given subject before an audience for purposes of instruction" is from 1530s. Meaning "admonitory speech given with a view to reproof or correction" is from c. 1600. Lecture-room is from 1793; lecture-hall from 1832. In Greek the words still had the double senses relating to "to speak" and "to gather" (apologos "a story, tale, fable;" elaiologos "an olive gatherer").

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elective (adj.)

early 15c., "voluntary," from Late Latin electivus, from elect-, past-participle stem of eligere "to pick out, choose" (see election). In U.S., in reference to school subjects studied at the student's choice, first recorded 1847. As a noun, from 1701.

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chosen (n.)
"the elect, the select," especially those selected by God, c. 1200, from past participle of choose (v.). Chosen people for "the Jews" is recorded from 1530s.
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conclave (n.)

late 14c., "a place where cardinals meet to elect a pope," also "the assembly of cardinals to elect a pope," from Italian conclave, from Latin conclave "a private room, chamber suite," probably originally "a room which may be locked," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + clavis "a key" (from PIE root *klau- "hook"). Extended sense of "any private assembly" is by 1560s.

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conscript (adj.)

mid-15c., "registered, enrolled," from Latin conscriptus "enrolled, chosen, elect," past participle of conscribere "to draw up, list," literally "to write together" from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut").

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