Etymology
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egotism (n.)
1714, "too frequent use of 'I'," from ego + -ism. First used by Joseph Addison, who credits the term to "Port-Royalists" who used it in reference to obtrusive use of first person singular pronoun in writing, hence "talking too much about oneself." Meaning "self-conceit, selfishness" is from 1800. The -t- is abnormal, perhaps by influence of dogmatism.
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wegotism (n.)
1797, from we + egotism; "an obtrusive and too frequent use of the first person plural by a speaker or writer" [OED].
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egotist (n.)
1714, "one who makes too frequent use of the first-person singular pronoun," see ego + -ist. First attested in Joseph Addison (see egotism). Related: Egotistic; egotistical; egotistically.
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egoism (n.)
1785, in metaphysics, "the theory that a person has no proof that anything exists outside his own mind," from French égoisme (1755), from Modern Latin egoismus, from Latin ego (see ego). Meaning "doing or seeking of that which affords pleasure or advances interest" is from 1800; opposed to altruism, but not necessarily "selfish." Meaning "self-centeredness" is from 1840. Between egoism and egotism, egoism is more correctly formed; there formerly was a useful distinction, with egotism tending to take the senses "self-centeredness" and "extensive use of 'I'" and leaving to egoism the theoretical sense in metaphysics and ethics.
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self- 
word forming element indicating "oneself," also "automatic," from Old English use of self (pron.) in compounds, such as selfbana "suicide," selflice "self-love, pride, vanity, egotism," selfwill "free will."
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machine-gun (n.)

"a gun which by means of a mechanism delivers a continuous fire of projectiles," 1870, from machine (n.) + gun (n.). As a verb, "to shoot down or kill by means of a machine gun," it is attested by 1915. Related: Machine-gunned; machine-gunning; machine-gunner.

A man is entitled to the fruits of his labor, and to assert a just claim is a duty as well as a right. In the year 1861 I first conceived the idea of a machine gun, which has been ever since the great controlling idea of my life; and it certainly cannot be regarded as egotism when I express the belief that I am the originator of the first successful weapon of the kind ever invented. [R.J. Gatling, quoted in Scientific American, Oct. 15, 1870]

Though in the light of subsequent advancements Gatling's invention of 1862 is not considered a modern machine-gun.

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