Etymology
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educate (v.)
Origin and meaning of educate

mid-15c., educaten, "bring up (children), to train," from Latin educatus, past participle of educare "bring up, rear, educate" (source also of Italian educare, Spanish educar, French éduquer), which is a frequentative of or otherwise related to educere "bring out, lead forth," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + ducere "to lead," from PIE root *deuk- "to lead." Meaning "provide schooling" is first attested 1580s. Related: Educated; educating.

According to "Century Dictionary," educere, of a child, is "usually with reference to bodily nurture or support, while educare refers more frequently to the mind," and, "There is no authority for the common statement that the primary sense of education is to 'draw out or unfold the powers of the mind.'"

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re-educate (v.)

also reeducate, "to educate anew or again," 1808, from re- "again" + educate (v.). "Now often spec. with the object of changing political beliefs or social behavior," according to OED 2nd ed., which carries a citation in this sense from 1947. Related: Re-educated; re-educating; re-education.

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uneducated (adj.)
1580s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of educate (v.).
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educable (adj.)
1836, "fit to be educated," 1836, from French éducable; see educate + -able.
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miseducate (v.)

"educate wrongly," 1790, from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + educate (v.). Related: Miseducated; miseducating.

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educated (adj.)
1660s, past-participle adjective from educate (v.). As an abbreviated way to say well-educated, attested from 1855. Educated guess first attested 1954.
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educative (adj.)

"tending to educate, consisting in educating," 1795, from Latin educat-, past-participle stem of educare "bring up, rear, educate" (see educate) + -ive.

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educe (v.)
early 15c., in the literal sense, "to draw out, extract; branch out," from Latin educere "to lead out, bring out" (troops, ships, etc.; see educate). Meaning "bring into view or operation" is from c. 1600. Meaning "to draw a conclusion from data" is from 1837.
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educator (n.)
1560s, "one who nourishes or rears;" 1670s, "one who trains or instructs," from Latin educator (in classical Latin, "a foster father," then also "a tutor"), agent noun from past participle stem of educare (see educate). Latin educatrix meant "a nurse."
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education (n.)
Origin and meaning of education

1530s, "child-rearing," also "the training of animals," from French education (14c.) and directly from Latin educationem (nominative educatio) "a rearing, training," noun of action from past-participle stem of educare (see educate). Originally of instruction in social codes and manners; meaning "systematic schooling and training for work" is from 1610s.

All education is despotism. [William Godwin, "Enquirer," 1797] 
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