Etymology
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edition (n.)

early 15c., "version, translation, a form of a literary work;" 1550s, "act of publishing," from French édition or directly from Latin editionem (nominative editio) "a bringing forth, producing," also "a statement, account," from past-participle stem of edere "bring forth, produce," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -dere, combining form of dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). "It is awkward to speak of, e.g. 'The second edition of Campbell's edition of Plato's "Theætetus"'; but existing usage affords no satisfactory substitute for this inconvenient mode of expression" [OED].

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inedita (n.)
"unpublished writings," Modern Latin noun use of neuter plural of Latin ineditus, from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + editus, past participle of edere "to bring forth, produce" (see edition).
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editor (n.)
Origin and meaning of editor
1640s, "publisher," from Latin editor "one who puts forth," agent noun from editus, past participle of edere "to bring forth, produce" (see edition). By 1712 in sense of "person who prepares written matter for publication;" specific sense in newspapers is from 1803.
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edit (v.)
1791, "to publish," perhaps a back-formation from editor, or from French éditer (itself a back-formation from édition) or from Latin editus, past participle of edere "give out, put out, publish" (see edition). Meaning "to supervise for publication" is from 1793. Meaning "make revisions to a manuscript, etc.," is from 1885. Related: Edited; editing. As a noun, by 1960, "an act of editing."
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*do- 

*dō-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to give."

It forms all or part of: add; anecdote; antidote; betray; condone; dacha; dado; data; date (n.1) "time;" dative; deodand; die (n.); donation; donative; donor; Dorian; Dorothy; dose; dowager; dower; dowry; edition; endow; Eudora; fedora; Isidore; mandate; Pandora; pardon; perdition; Polydorus; render; rent (n.1) "payment for use of property;" sacerdotal; samizdat; surrender; Theodore; Theodosia; tradition; traitor; treason; vend.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit dadati "gives," danam "offering, present;" Old Persian dadatuv "let him give;" Greek didomi, didonai, "to give, offer," dōron "gift;" Latin dare "to give, grant, offer," donum "gift;" Armenian tam "to give;" Old Church Slavonic dati "give," dani "tribute;" Lithuanian duoti "to give," duonis "gift;" Old Irish dan "gift, endowment, talent," Welsh dawn "gift."

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supportive (adj.)
1590s, from support (v.) + -ive. Called "rare" in OED 1st edition and Century Dictionary. Related: Supportively; supportiveness.
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care-worm (n.)
a word listed in 2nd print edition OED, whose editors found it once, in the 1598 edition of W. Phillip's translation of John Huyghen van Linschoten's account of his voyage to the East Indies, and marked it "? error for EAREWORM." But care-worm could be a useful word.
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variorum (adj.)
"an edition (especially of the complete works of a classical author) with notes of various commentators or editors," 1728, genitive masculine plural of Latin varius "different, diverse" (see vary), in phrase editio cum notis variorum. Its use with reference to an edition of an author's works containing variant readings (1955) is "deplored by some scholars" [OED].
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reprint (v.)

also re-print, 1550s, "print again, print a second or new edition of," from re- "back, again" + print (v.). Related: Reprinted; reprinting.

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Struwwelpeter (n.)
German, name of a character in the children's book by Heinrich Hoffman (1809-1894). There was an English edition by 1848.
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