Etymology
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economise (v.)
chiefly British English spelling of economize. For suffix, see -ize. Related: Economised; economising.
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economy (n.)
Origin and meaning of economy

1530s, "household management," from Latin oeconomia (source of French économie, Spanish economia, German Ökonomie, etc.), from Greek oikonomia "household management, thrift," from oikonomos "manager, steward," from oikos "house, abode, dwelling" (cognate with Latin vicus "district," vicinus "near;" Old English wic "dwelling, village," from PIE root *weik- (1) "clan") + nomos "managing," from nemein "manage" (from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take"). Meaning "frugality, judicious use of resources" is from 1660s. The sense of "wealth and resources of a country" (short for political economy) is from 1650s.

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economy (adj.)
1821 as a term in advertising, at first meant simply "cheaper," then "bigger and thus cheaper per unit or amount" (1950). See economy (n.).
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economist (n.)

1580s, "household manager," from French économiste; see economy + -ist. Meaning "student of political economy" is from 1804.

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econometric (adj.)
1933, from economy + -metric. Related: Econometrics.
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macroeconomic (adj.)

also macro-economic, "pertaining to the economy as a whole," 1938, from macro- + economic.

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ineconomy (n.)
"waste of resources," 1881, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + economy (n.).
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protectionism (n.)

"doctrine or system of protection in political economy," 1846, from protectionist + -ism.

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banana republic (n.)
"small Central American state with an economy dependent on banana production," 1901, American English.
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macroeconomics (n.)

also macro-economics, "the science or study of the economy as a whole," by 1946, from macroeconomic; also see -ics.

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