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31 entries found.
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economics (n.)
1580s, "art of managing a household," perhaps from French économique (see economic); also see -ics. Meaning "science of wealth" is from 1792.
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microeconomics (n.)

also micro-economics, "the branch of economics concerned with single factors and individual decisions," 1948, from micro- + economics. Related: Microeconomic (adj.).

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ergonomics (n.)
"scientific study of the efficiency of people in the workplace," coined 1950 from Greek ergon "work" (from PIE root *werg- "to do") + second element of economics.
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annualize (v.)
in economics and finance, 1904; see annual (adj.) + -ize. Related: Annualized; annualizing.
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upturn (n.)
1868, "upturned part," from up (adv.) + turn (n.). Meaning "improvement" (especially in economics) is from 1930.
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upswing (n.)
1922, in golf, from up (adv.) + swing (n.). Sense in economics is attested from 1934.
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disequilibrium (n.)

"absence or destruction of equilibrium," 1840; see dis- + equilibrium. Specific sense in economics is by 1927.

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divestiture (n.)

c. 1600, "act of stripping or depriving," from divest on analogy of investiture. Economics sense is by 1955.

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macroeconomics (n.)

also macro-economics, "the science or study of the economy as a whole," by 1946, from macroeconomic; also see -ics.

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bimetallic (adj.)
also bi-metallic, "composed of two metals," 1864; see bi- "two" + metallic. In economics, "pertaining to the use of both silver and gold as standards in currency," 1876, from French bimétalique (Cornuschi).
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