Etymology
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ecdysiast (n.)
H.L. Mencken's invented proper word for "strip-tease artist," 1940, from Greek ekdysis "a stripping or casting off" (used scientifically in English from mid-19c. with reference to serpents shedding skin and molting birds or crustacea), from ekdyein "to put off one's clothes, take off, strip off" (contrasted with endyo "to put on"), from ek (see ex-) + dyein "enter, to dive; to plunge; get into, slip into, put on," which, according to Beekes, is "related to the rare Sanskrit verb upa-du- 'to put on' ...."
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apodyterium (n.)
"undressing room" (in a Greek or Roman bath house or palaestra), 1690s, from Latin apodyterium, from Greek apodyterion "undressing room," from apodyein "to put off, undress," from apo "off" (see apo-) + dyein "to put on, enter, go in" (see ecdysiast).
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troglodyte (n.)

"cave-dweller," 1550s, from French troglodyte and directly from Latin troglodytae (plural), from Greek troglodytes "cave-dweller, cave-man" (in reference to tribes identified as living in various places by ancient writers; by Herodotus on the African coast of the Red Sea), literally "one who creeps into holes," from trogle "hole, mouse-hole" (from trogein "to gnaw, nibble, munch;" see trout) + dyein "go in, dive in" (see ecdysiast). Related: Troglodytic.

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