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21 entries found
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earthenware (n.)
vessels or other objects of baked or dried clay, 1670s, from earthen + ware (n.). Old English eorðwaran meant "earth-dwellers."
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ware (n.)

"manufactured goods, goods for sale," Old English waru "article of merchandise," also "protection, guard," hence probably originally "object of care, that which is kept in custody," from Proto-Germanic *waro (source also of Swedish vara, Danish vare, Old Frisian were, Middle Dutch were, Dutch waar, Middle High German, German ware "goods"), from PIE root *wer- (3) "perceive, watch out for."

Usually wares, except in compounds such as hardware, earthenware, etc. Lady ware was a jocular 17c. euphemism for "a woman's private parts" (but sometimes also "male sex organs"), and Middle English had ape-ware "deceptive or false ware; tricks" (mid-13c.).

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delftware (n.)
1714, from Delft, town in Holland where the glazed earthenware was made, + ware (n.).
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terrine (n.)
earthenware dish, 1706, obsolete original form of tureen.
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piss-pot (n.)

"chamber-pot, earthenware vessel for urine," mid-15c., pisse-pot, from piss + pot (n.1).

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insulator (n.)
1801, agent noun in Latin form from insulate (v.). In reference to the glass or earthenware devices to hold telegraph (later telephone) wires, from 1840s.
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stein (n.)
earthenware mug, 1855, from German Stein, shortened form of Steinkrug "stone jug," from Stein "stone" (see stone (n.)) + Krug "jug, jar." Compare Old English stæne "pitcher, jug."
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gill (n.2)

liquid measure (in modern use commonly a quarter of a pint), late 13c., from Old French gille, a wine measure, and from Medieval Latin gillo "earthenware jar," words of uncertain origin, perhaps related to the source of gallon.

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piggy (n.)

also piggie, "a little pig," by 1700, from pig (n.1) + -y (3). Related: Piggies. The piggy bank was popular from 1940 (ceramic or tin pig banks are noted by 1903 in American English, sometimes as souvenirs from Mexico).

The dates seem too early for this to be a source of that, but Scottish and Northern English pig (of unknown origin) meant "earthenware pot, pitcher, jar, etc." (mid-15c.), and in Scottish dialect pirlie pig (1799) was "small money box, usually circular and made of earthenware."

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Stafford 
city in England, mid-11c., Stæfford, literally "ford by a landing-place," from Old English stæð "river bank, shore" + ford (n.). County town of Staffordshire, which, as a name for a type of earthenware and porcelain made there is attested from 1765. The city was noted in medieval England as a source of blue cloth.
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