Etymology
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early (adv.)

Old English ærlice "early, near the initial point of some reckoning in time," from ær "soon, ere" (see ere) + -lice, adverbial suffix (see -ly (2)). Compare Old Norse arliga "early." The adjective is Old English ærlic. The early bird of the proverb is from 1670s. Related: Earlier; earliest.

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makeless (adj.)
early 13c., "peerless, without equal," from make (n.) + -less. Meaning "mateless, widowed" is from early 15c.
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sparkling (adj.)
early 13c., present-participle adjective from sparkle (v.). Of eyes and wines from early 15c.; of conversation from 1640s. Related: Sparklingly.
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offender (n.)

early 15c., offendour, "a lawbreaker; a sinner," agent noun from offend (v.). Earlier was offendour (early 15c.), from Anglo-French.

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stepping (n.)
early 14c., verbal noun from step (v.). Stepping stone first recorded early 14c.; in the figurative sense 1650s.
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scalding (adj.)

early 13c., schaldinde, present-participle adjective from scald (v.)). Scalding hot is attested by early 15c.; scald hot is from late 14c.

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slaver (v.)
"dribble from the mouth," early 14c., from Old Norse slafra "to slaver," probably imitative (compare slobber (v.)). Related: Slavered; slavering. The noun is from early 14c.
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covent (n.)

"a convent or monastery" (early 13c.), also "a meeting, gathering, assembly" (c. 1300); an early variant of convent (n.) that lingered into the 17c.

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whore-house (n.)
early 14c., from whore (n.) + house (n.). Sometimes translating Latin lupanaria. Obsolete from c. 1700, revived early 20c. in American English.
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ungracious (adj.)
c. 1200, "ungrateful;" early 14c., "lacking God's grace;" early 15c., "rude, unmannerly," from un- (1) "not" + gracious (adj.). Related: Ungraciously.
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