Etymology
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E pluribus unum 

motto of the United States, being one nation formed by uniting several states, 1782, Latin, from e "out of" (see ex-); ablative plural of plus "more" (see plus (n.)); neuter of unus "one" (from PIE root *oi-no- "one, unique"). Not found in classical Latin, though a variant of the phrase appears in Virgil (color est e pluribus unum); the full phrase was the motto of the popular Gentleman's Magazine from 1731 into the 1750s.

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each other 
reciprocal pronoun, originally in late Old English a phrase, with each as the subject and other inflected (as it were "each to other," "each from other," etc.).
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easy chair (n.)
also easy-chair, one designed especially for comfort, 1707, from easy + chair (n.).
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ecce homo 
Latin, literally "behold the man" (John xix.5), from Latin ecce "lo!, behold!" Christ crowned with thorns, especially as the subject of a painting.
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Eiffel Tower 
erected in the Champ-de-Mars for the Paris Universal Exposition of 1889; at 984.25 feet the world's tallest structure at the time. Designed by French engineer Alexandre Gustave Eiffel (1832-1923).
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en bloc 
French, "in a block" (see bloc).
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en masse 
French, literally "in mass" (see mass (n.1)).
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en passant 
French, literally "in passing," from present participle of passer "to pass" (see pass (v.)). In reference to chess, first attested 1818.
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en route 
1779, French, literally "on the way" (see route (n.)).
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