Etymology
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efflorescent (adj.)

"blooming, being in flower; apt to effloresce," 1741, from Latin efflorescentem (nominative efflorescens), present participle of efflorescere "to bloom, flourish," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + florescere "to blossom," from flos "flower" (from PIE root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom").

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effluence (n.)
c. 1600, "that which flows out;" 1620s, "act of flowing out," from Late Latin effluentia, from Latin effluentem (nominative effluens) "flowing out," present participle of effluere "to flow out," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent). Related: Effluency.
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effluent (adj.)
mid-15c., from Latin effluentem (nominative effluens) "flowing out," present participle of effluere "to flow out," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent). As a noun, "that which flows out," from 1859; specific meaning "liquid industrial waste" is from 1930.
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effluvia (n.)
Latin plural of effluvium. Sometimes mistaken for a singular and re-pluralized.
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effluvium (n.)
1640s, from Latin effluvium "a flowing out, an outlet," from effluere "to flow out," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent). Related: Effluvial.
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efflux (n.)
1640s, "act or state of flowing out," also "that which flows out," from Latin effluxus, noun use of past participle of effluere "to flow out," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent)
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effort (n.)

late 15c., "laborious attempt, strenuous exertion," from French effort, from Old French esforz "force, impetuosity, strength, power," verbal noun from esforcier "force out, exert oneself," from Vulgar Latin *exfortiare "to show strength" (source of Italian sforza), from Latin ex "out" (see ex-) + Latin fortis "strong" (see fort).

Effort is only effort when it begins to hurt. [José Ortega y Gasset, writing of Goethe in Partisan Review, vol. xvi, part ii, 1949]

Related: Efforts "voluntary exertion," also "result of exertion."

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effortless (adj.)
1752, "passive, making no effort," from effort + -less. Meaning "easy, requiring no effort" is from 1810. Related: Effortlessly; effortlessness.
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effrontery (n.)
"shamelessness, impudence, boldness in transgressing the bounds of modesty and propriety," 1715, from French effronterie, from effronté "shameless," from Old French esfronte "shameless, brazen," probably from Late Latin effrontem (nominative effrons) "barefaced, shameless," from assimilated form of Latin ex "out" (see ex-) + frontem (nominative frons) "brow" (see front (n.)). Also compare affront.

Latin frontus had a sense of "ability to blush," but the literal sense of effrontery often has been taken to be "putting forth the forehead." Forehead in Johnson's Dictionary (1755) has a secondary sense of "impudence; confidence; assurance; audaciousness; audacity." English had an earlier verb effront "treat with effrontery" (17c.).
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effulgence (n.)

1660s (Milton), from Late Latin effulgentia, from Latin effulgentem (nominative effulgens), present participle of effulgere "to shine out, gleam forth," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fulgere (from PIE *bhleg- "to shine, flash," from root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn").

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