Etymology
Advertisement
Advertisement
eff (v.)
1943, euphemism for fuck, representing the sound of its first letter. Related: Effing.
Related entries & more 
effable (adj.)
"that may be (lawfully) expressed in words," 1630s, from French effable or directly, from Latin effabilis "utterable," from effari "to utter" (see ineffable). Now obsolete or archaic.
Related entries & more 
efface (v.)
Origin and meaning of efface

"to erase or obliterate," especially something written or carved, late 15c., from French effacer, from Old French esfacier (12c.) "to wipe out, destroy," literally "to remove the face," from es- "out" (see ex-) + face "appearance," from Latin facies "face" (see face (n.)). Related: Effaced; effacing; effaceable. Compare deface.

Related entries & more 
effacement (n.)
1743, from French effacement; see efface + -ment.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
effect (n.)
Origin and meaning of effect
mid-14c., "execution or completion (of an act)," from Old French efet (13c., Modern French effet) "result, execution, completion, ending," from Latin effectus "accomplishment, performance," from past participle stem of efficere "work out, accomplish," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + combining form of facere "to make, to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). From French, borrowed into Dutch, German, Scandinavian.

From late 14c. as "power or capacity to produce an intended result; efficacy, effectiveness," and in astrology, "operation or action (of a heavenly body) on human affairs; influence." Also "that which follows from something else; a consequence, a result." From early 15c. as "intended result, purpose, object, intent." Also formerly with a sense of "reality, fact," hence in effect (late 14c.), originally "in fact, actually, really." Meaning "impression produced on the beholder" is from 1736. Sense in stage effect, sound effect, etc. first recorded 1881.
Related entries & more 
effect (v.)
Origin and meaning of effect
"to produce as a result; to bring to a desired end," 1580s, from Latin effectus, past participle of efficere "work out, accomplish" (see effect (n.)). Related: Effecting; effection; effectible.
Related entries & more 
effected (adj.)
"brought about," past-participle adjective from effect (v.). Since early 15c. sometimes used erroneously for affected.
Related entries & more 
effective (adj.)
late 14c., "serving to effect the intended purpose," from Old French effectif, from Latin effectivus "productive, effective," from effect-, stem of efficere "work out, accomplish" (see effect (n.)). Of military forces, "fit for action or duty," from 1680s.
Related entries & more 
effectively (adv.)
1650s, "actually," from effective + -ly (2). From c. 1600 as "as a means of producing;" from 1825 as "so as to produce an effect."
Related entries & more 

Page 23