Etymology
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dynamic (n.)

"energetic force; motive force," 1894, from dynamic (adj.). As "manner of interaction," by 1978.

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dynamic (adj.)

by 1812, "pertaining to mechanical forces not in equilibrium, pertaining to force producing motion" (the opposite of static), from French dynamique introduced by German mathematician Gottfried Leibnitz (1646-1716) in 1691 from Greek dynamikos "powerful," from dynamis "power," from dynasthai "to be able, to have power, be strong enough," which is of unknown origin. The figurative sense of "active, potent, effective, energetic" is from 1856 (in Emerson). Related: Dynamically.

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equilibrium (n.)
c. 1600, "state of mental balance," from Latin aequilibrium "an even balance; a horizontal position," from aequilibris "equal, level, horizontal, evenly balanced," from aequus "equal" (see equal (adj.)) + libra "a balance, pair of scales, plummet" (see Libra). Related: Equilibrious.
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disequilibrium (n.)

"absence or destruction of equilibrium," 1840; see dis- + equilibrium. Specific sense in economics is by 1927.

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aerodynamic (adj.)
also aero-dynamic, "pertaining to the forces of air in motion," 1847; see aero- + dynamic (adj.). Compare German aerodynamische (1835), French aérodynamique.
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dynamism (n.)

1831, "dynamic energy, force, drive," from Greek dynamis "power, might, strength" (see dynamic (adj.)) + -ism. As a name for philosophical systems that require some force to explain the phenomena of nature, by 1857.

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balanced (adj.)
1590s, "in equilibrium," past-participle adjective from balance (v.). In reference to meal, diet, etc., by 1908.
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psychodynamic (adj.)

also psycho-dynamic, 1856, in homeopathic publications, "pertaining to mental powers" (mesmerism, etc.), from psycho- + dynamic (adj.). By 1874 as "pertaining to psychodynamics," the science of the laws of mental action (George Henry Lewes).

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dynamite (n.)

powerful explosive consisting of a mixture of nitroglycerine with an absorbent, 1867, from Swedish dynamit, coined 1867 by its inventor, Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel (1833-1896), from Greek dynamis "power" (see dynamic (adj.)) + -ite (2). Figurative sense of "something potentially dangerous" is from 1922. Positive sense of "dynamic and excellent" by mid-1960s, perhaps originally African-American vernacular.

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