Etymology
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nines (n.)

in phrase to the nines "to perfection, fully, elaborately" (1787) first attested in Burns, apparently preserves the ancient notion of the perfection of the number as three times three (such as the nine Muses, the Nine Worthies, ancient personages famous for bravery, and the nine orders of angels).

[T]he Book of St. Albans, in the sections on blasonry, lays great stress on the nines in which all perfect things (orders of angels, virtues, articles of chivalry, differences of coat armour, etc.) occur. [Weekley]

No one seems to consider that it might be a corruption and misdivision of to then anes, literally "for the one (purpose or occasion)," a similar construction to that which yielded nonce (q.v.). Century Dictionary suspects it is a corruption of Middle English to then eyne "to the eyes."

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underdressed (adj.)
also under-dressed, "too plainly dressed," 1759, from under (adv.) + past participle of dress (v.).
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travesty (n.)
1670s, "literary burlesque of a serious work," from adjective meaning "dressed so as to be made ridiculous, parodied, burlesqued" (1660s), from French travesti "dressed in disguise," past participle of travestir "to disguise" (1590s), from Italian travestire "to disguise," from Latin trans "across, beyond; over" (see trans-) + vestire "to clothe" (from PIE *wes- (2) "to clothe," extended form of root *eu- "to dress").
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coonskin (n.)

"the skin of the raccoon, dressed with the fur on," 1818, American English, from coon + skin (n.).

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masonry (n.)

mid-14c., masonrie, "stonework, a construction of dressed or fitted stones;" late 14c., "art or occupation of a mason;" from Old French maçonerie (14c.), from maçon (see mason).

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chop-house (n.)
1680s, "a mean house of entertainment, where provision ready dressed is sold" [Johnson], from chop (n.) in the "meat" sense + house (n.).
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tatterdemalion (n.)
"ragged child, person dressed in old clothes," c. 1600, probably from tatter (n.), with fantastic second element, but perhaps also suggested by Tartar, with a contemporary sense of "vagabond, gypsy."
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rag-doll (n.)

child's plaything, doll made entirely of rags or scraps of cloth, 1776 (from 1757 as "a dressed-up woman"), from rag (n.1) + doll (n.). Rag-baby is attested from 1798. Shakespeare has babe of clowts (i.e. "clouts"), 1590s.

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trim (adj.)
c. 1500, "neatly or smartly dressed," probably ultimately from trim (v.) or from related Old English trum "firm, fixed, secure, strong, sound, vigorous, active." Related: Trimly; trimness.
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sealskin (n.)

"the skin of a fur seal," dressed for use as material for clothing, etc., early 14c., from seal (n.2) + skin (n.). As an adjective by 1769.

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