Etymology
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drawer (n.)

mid-14c., "one who draws (water from a well, etc.); one who pulls, drags, or transports," agent noun from draw (v.). Also formerly "a waiter, bartender" (1560s). Attested from 1570s in sense of "a box-shaped receptacle that can be 'drawn' or pulled out of a cabinet, bureau, table, etc., by sliding it horizontally."

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protractor (n.)

1610s, "one who lengthens (an action)," Modern Latin agent noun from Latin protrahere "to draw forward" (see protraction). Medieval Latin protractor meant "one who calls or drags another into court." The surveying sense of "instrument for measuring and drawing angles on paper" is recorded from 1650s. As "muscle which serves to extend a limb or member," by 1861.

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dragster (n.)

"hot rod or constructed car designed for maximum engine efficiency with no regard for style," 1954, from drag (n.) in the racing sense + -ster, perhaps abstracted from roadster.

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