Etymology
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douche (n.)

1766, "jet of water or current applied to some part of the body," from French douche (16c.), from Italian doccia "shower," from docciare "to spray," from Latin ductionem "a leading" (from ducere "to lead," from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). The sense in reference to vaginal cleansing is by 1833. The verb is attested by 1838. Related: Douched; douching.

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douchebag (n.)
also douche-bag, douche bag, 1893, from douche + bag (n.). American English slang sense of "contemptible person" attested by 1967.
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*deuk- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to lead."

It forms all or part of: abduce; abducent; abduct; abduction; adduce; aqueduct; circumduction; conduce; conducive; conduct; conductor; conduit; deduce; deduction; dock (n.1) "ship's berth;" doge; douche; ducal; ducat; Duce; duchess; duchy; duct; ductile; duke (n.); educate; education; induce; induction; introduce; introduction; misconduct; produce; production; reduce; reduction; seduce; seduction; subduce; subduction; taut; team (n.); teem (v.1) "abound, swarm, be prolific;" tie (n.); tow (v.); traduce; transducer; tug; zugzwang.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin dux (genitive ducis) "leader, commander," in Late Latin "governor of a province," ducere "to lead;" Old English togian "to pull, drag," teonteon "to pull, drag;" German Zaum "bridle," ziehen "to draw, pull, drag;" Middle Welsh dygaf "I draw."
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