Etymology
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dogs (n.)
"feet," 1913, from rhyming slang dog's meat.
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gun-shy (adj.)
1849, originally of sporting dogs, from gun (n.) + shy (adj.).
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dog's meat (n.)

"horse flesh, offal, scraps, etc., used as food for dogs," 1590s.

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badger (v.)

"to attack persistently, worry, pester," 1790, from badger (n.), based on the behavior of the dogs in the medieval sport of badger-baiting, still practiced in late 19c. England as an attraction to low public houses. Related: Badgered; badgering.

A badger is put into a barrel, and one or more dogs are put in to drag him out. When this is effected he is returned to his barrel, to be similarly assailed by a fresh set of dogs. The badger usually makes a most determined and savage resistance. [Century Dictionary]
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neuter (v.)

"castrate, render (a male) incapable of generation," 1893, in reference to dogs, from neuter (adj.). Related: Neutered; neutering.

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Chihuahua (n.)

 city and state in Mexico, said to be from a lost native word that meant "dry place." The dog breed is attested by that name from 1854, though such dogs seem to have been bred there long before. Early American explorers in the west seem to have confused the somewhat with prairie dogs.

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canaille (n.)
"the rabble, the lowest order of people collectively," 1670s, from French canaille (16c.), from Italian canaglia, literally "a pack of dogs," from cane "dog," from Latin canis (from PIE root *kwon- "dog").
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cur (n.)

c. 1200, curre, a term, usually depreciatory, for a dog, earlier kurdogge; used of vicious dogs and cowardly dogs, mastiffs and terriers, probably from Old Norse kurra or Middle Low German korren both meaning "to growl" and echoic of a growling dog. Compare Swedish dialectal kurre, Middle Dutch corre "house dog." Meaning "surly, low-bred man" is from 1580s.

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baiting (n.)
"act of worrying a chained or confined animal with dogs," c. 1300, also figurative, verbal noun from bait (v.1). Related: Baitingly.
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dew claw (n.)

also dew-claw, "rudimentary inner toe of the foot, especially the hind foot, of some dogs," 1570s, from claw, but the signification of the first element is obscure (compare dewlap).

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