Etymology
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does (v.)

third-person singular present indicative of do (v.), originally a Northumbrian variant in Old English that displaced doth, doeth in literary English 16c.-17c.

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doth 

former third person singular present indicative of do; see does.

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do (v.)

"perform, execute, achieve, carry out, bring to pass by procedure of any kind," etc., etc., Middle English do, first person singular of Old English don "make, act, perform, cause; to put, to place," from West Germanic *doanan (source also of Old Saxon duan, Old Frisian dwa, Dutch doen, Old High German tuon, German tun), from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put, place."

Use as an auxiliary began in Middle English. Sense of "to put, place, lay" is obsolete except in phrases such as do away with. Periphrastic form in negative sentences (They did not think) replaced the Old English negative particles (Hie ne wendon).

Meaning "visit as a tourist" is from 1817. In old slang it meant "to hoax, cheat, swindle" (1640s). Slang meaning "to do the sex act with or to" is from 1913.

Slang do in "bring disaster upon, kill" is by 1905. To have to do with "have concern or connection with" is from late 13c. To do without "dispense with" is from 1713.  Expression do or die indicating determination to succeed despite dangers or obstacles is attested from 1620s.

Compare does, did, done.

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doesn't 
1690s, contraction of does not.
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dingus (n.)

"any unspecified or unspecifiable object; something one does not know the name of or does not wish to name," by 1874, U.S. slang, from Dutch dinges, literally "thing" (see thing).

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non-communicant (n.)

"one who does not receive the holy communion," c. 1600, from non- + communicant.

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non sequitur (n.)

1530s, in logic, "an inference or conclusion that does not follow from the premise," a Latin phrase, "it does not follow," from non "not" + third person singular present indicative of sequi "to follow" (from PIE root *sekw- (1) "to follow").

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leg-man (n.)
"assistant who does leg work," 1923; see leg (n.)).
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no-place (n.)
also noplace, "place which does not exist," 1929, from no + place (n.).
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serving (adj.)

"that does service (to another)," c. 1300, present-participle adjective from serve (v.).

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