Etymology
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probability (n.)

mid-15c., probabilite, "likelihood of being realized, appearance of truth, quality of being probable," from Old French probabilite (14c.) and directly from Latin probabilitatem (nominative probabilitas) "credibility, probability," from probabilis (see probable).

Meaning "something likely to be true" is from 1570s; mathematical sense is from 1718, "frequency with which a proposition similar to the one in question is found true in the course of experience."

In weather forecasting, probabilities was used in U.S. from 1869 and adopted in the official weather forecasts of the United States Signal Service; hence Old Probabilities, a humorous name for the chief signal officer of the Signal Service Bureau (by 1875).

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divorce (n.)

late 14c., "legal dissolution of the bond of marriage," from Old French divorce (14c.), from Latin divortium "separation, dissolution of marriage," from divertere "to separate, leave one's husband, turn aside" (see divert). Not distinguished in English from legal separation until mid-19c. Extended sense of "complete separation, absolute disjunction" is from early 15c.

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divorce (v.)

c. 1400, divorcen, "to put away or abandon (a spouse); to dissolve the marriage contract between by process of law," from Old French divorcer, from divorce (see divorce (n.)). Extended sense of "release or sever from any close connection" is from early 15c. Related: Divorced; divorcing.

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divorcee (n.)

"divorced woman," 1764, from French divorcée, noun use of fem. past participle of divorcer (see divorce (v.)). It began to lose its italics by the 1880s. The male equivalent in French is divorcé.

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likeliness (n.)

late 14c., "resemblance," also "probability," from likely + -ness.

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likelihood (n.)

late 14c., "resemblance, similarity," from likely + -hood. Meaning "probability, state of being like or probable" is from mid-15c.

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divorcement (n.)

1520s, "act or process of divorcing," from divorce (v.) + -ment. General sense of "severance of a close relation" is from 1550s.

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repudiate (v.)

1540s, "to cast off by divorce," also general, "reject, refuse to accept" (a person or thing), from Latin repudiatus, past participle of repudiare "to cast off, put away, divorce, reject, scorn, disdain," from repudium "divorce, rejection, a putting away, dissolution of marriage," from re- "back, away" (see re-) + pudium.

This is probably is related to pudere "cause shame to," a verb of unknown etymology. Barnhart, however, suggests it is related to pes/ped- "foot," in which case the original notion may be of kicking something away.

In reference to persons, "to disown," 1690s. Of opinions, conduct, etc., "to refuse to acknowledge, reject with condemnation," attested from 1824. Of debts by 1837. Earliest in English as an adjective meaning "divorced, rejected, condemned" (mid-15c.), from Latin repudiatus. Related: Repudiated; repudiating; repudiable.

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probabilistic (adj.)

1855, in Catholic theology (see probabilism), from probabilist "one who holds the doctrine of probabilism" (1650s, from French probabiliste, 17c., from Latin probabilis, see probable) + -ic. Meaning "pertaining to probability, involving chance variations" is from 1951.

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aroint (v.)

intransitive verb, c. 1600, used by Shakespeare (only in imperative, aroint thee! "begone!"), obsolete and of obscure origin. "[T]he subject of numerous conjectures, none of which can be said to have even a prima facie probability." [OED]

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