Etymology
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divorce (n.)

late 14c., "legal dissolution of the bond of marriage," from Old French divorce (14c.), from Latin divortium "separation, dissolution of marriage," from divertere "to separate, leave one's husband, turn aside" (see divert). Not distinguished in English from legal separation until mid-19c. Extended sense of "complete separation, absolute disjunction" is from early 15c.

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divorce (v.)

c. 1400, divorcen, "to put away or abandon (a spouse); to dissolve the marriage contract between by process of law," from Old French divorcer, from divorce (see divorce (n.)). Extended sense of "release or sever from any close connection" is from early 15c. Related: Divorced; divorcing.

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divorcement (n.)

1520s, "act or process of divorcing," from divorce (v.) + -ment. General sense of "severance of a close relation" is from 1550s.

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divorcee (n.)

"divorced woman," 1764, from French divorcée, noun use of fem. past participle of divorcer (see divorce (v.)). It began to lose its italics by the 1880s. The male equivalent in French is divorcé.

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repudiate (v.)

1540s, "to cast off by divorce," also general, "reject, refuse to accept" (a person or thing), from Latin repudiatus, past participle of repudiare "to cast off, put away, divorce, reject, scorn, disdain," from repudium "divorce, rejection, a putting away, dissolution of marriage," from re- "back, away" (see re-) + pudium.

This is probably is related to pudere "cause shame to," a verb of unknown etymology. Barnhart, however, suggests it is related to pes/ped- "foot," in which case the original notion may be of kicking something away.

In reference to persons, "to disown," 1690s. Of opinions, conduct, etc., "to refuse to acknowledge, reject with condemnation," attested from 1824. Of debts by 1837. Earliest in English as an adjective meaning "divorced, rejected, condemned" (mid-15c.), from Latin repudiatus. Related: Repudiated; repudiating; repudiable.

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co-respondent (n.)

in law, a joint respondent, one proceeded against along with another or others, 1857, from co- + respondent. "[S]pecifically, in Eng. law, a man charged with adultery, and made a party together with the wife to the husband's suit for divorce." [Century Dictionary].

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repulsion (n.)

early 15c., repulsioun, "driving away, repelling, repudiation," especially "divorce" (writ of repulsion), from Old French repulsion and directly from Late Latin repulsionem (nominative repulsio) "a repelling," noun of action from past-participle stem of repellere "to drive back" (see repel).

Meaning "action of forcing or driving back" is attested from 1540s. Sense of "strong dislike, repellent feeling" is from 1751.

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settlement (n.)
1620s, "act of fixing or steadying;" from settle (v.) + -ment. Meaning "a colony," especially a new one, "tract of country newly developed" is attested from 1690s; that of "small village on the frontier" is from 1827, American English. Sense of "payment of an account" is from 1729; legal sense "a settling of arrangements" (of divorce, property transfer, etc.) is from 1670s.
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repudiation (n.)

1540s, "divorce" (of a woman by a man), from Latin repudiationem (nominative repudiatio) "a rejection, refusal," noun of action from past-participle stem of repudiare (see repudiate). Meaning "action of disowning" is by 1850; specifically as "disavowal of an obligation, as of a debt lawfully contracted," by 1843, often originally of U.S. states during the financial crisis of 1837-43.

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split (n.)
1590s, "narrow cleft, crack, fissure," from split (v.). Meaning "piece of wood formed by splitting" is from 1610s. Meaning "an act of separation, a divorce" is from 1729. From 1861 as the name of the acrobatic feat. Meaning "a drink composed of two liquors" is from 1882; that of "sweet dish of sliced fruit with ice cream" is attested from 1920, American English. Slang meaning "share of the take" is from 1889. Meaning "a draw in a double-header" is from 1920.
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