Etymology
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divination (n.)

late 14c., divinacioun, "act of foretelling by supernatural or magical means the future, or discovering what is hidden or obscure," from Old French divination (13c.), from Latin divinationem (nominative divinatio) "the power of foreseeing, prediction," noun of action from past-participle stem of divinare, literally "to be inspired by a god," from divinus "of a god," from divus "a god," related to deus "god, deity" (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine," in derivatives "sky, heaven, god"). Related: Divinatory.

Divination hath been anciently and fitly divided into artificial and natural; whereof artificial is when the mind maketh a prediction by argument, concluding upon signs and tokens: natural is when the mind hath a presention by an internal power, without the inducement of a sign. [Francis Bacon, "The Advancement of Learning," 1605]
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ophiomancy (n.)

"the ancient art of divination by the movements and coilings of snakes, 1753, from ophio- "snake, serpent" + -mancy "divination by means of." Related: Ophiomantic; ophiomancer.

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psephomancy (n.)

"divination by means of pebbles drawn from a heap," 1727, from Greek psēphos "pebble" (a word of uncertain origin) + -mancy "divination by means of."

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oneiromancy (n.)

"divination through dreams," 1650s; see oneiro- "dream" + -mancy "divination by means of." Greek had oneiromantis "an interpreter of dreams." Related: oneiromantic.

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catoptromancy (n.)
"divination by means of a mirror," 1610s, from Latinized combining form of Greek katoptron "mirror" (see catoptric) + -mancy "divination by means of."
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arithmancy (n.)
"divination by numbers," 1570s, from Greek arithmos "number" (see arithmetic) + -mancy "divination by means of." Alternative arithmomancy is recorded from 1620s.
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augury (n.)

late 14c., "divination from the flight of birds," from Old French augure, augurie "divination, soothsaying, sorcery, enchantment," or directly from Latin augurium "divination, the observation and interpretation of omens" (see augur (n.)). Sense of "omen, portent, indication, that which forebodes" is from 1610s. Often in plural, auguries.

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chiromancy (n.)

"divination by the hand, palmistry," 1520s, from French chiromancie (14c.), from Medieval Latin chiromantia, from Late Greek kheiromanteia, from kheir "hand" (from PIE root *ghes- "the hand") + -mantia "divination" (see -mancy). Related: Chiromancer; chiromantic.

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pegomancy (n.)

"divination by fountains," 1727, from Latinized form of Greek pēgē "fountain, spring" (a word of unknown origin, possibly Pre-Greek) + -mancy "divination by means of."

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tephromancy (n.)
1650s, "divination by means of ashes," from Modern Latin tephromantia, from Greek tephra "ashes" + manteia "divination" (see -mancy).
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