Etymology
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disturb (v.)

late 13c. distourben, "to frighten, alarm, break up the tranquility of;" c. 1300, "to stop or hinder;" from Old French destorber (Old North French distourber) and directly from Latin disturbare "throw into disorder," from dis- "completely" (see dis-) + turbare "to disorder, disturb," from turba "turmoil" (see turbid). Related: Disturbed; disturbing; disturbingly.

Middle English also had the verb as distourblen, from Old French destorbler; hence also distourbler (n.) "one who disturbs or incites" (late 14c.).

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disturbed (adj.)

1590s, "agitated, put out of a settled state or regular order," past-participle adjective from disturb. Meaning "emotionally or mentally unstable" is from 1904.

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interturb (v.)

"to disturb by interruption" (obsolete), 1550s, from Latin inturbus, past participle of inturbare "disturb by interruption," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + turbare "to disturb, confuse" (see turbid). Related: Interturber (1530s).

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perturb (v.)

late 14c., perturben, "disturb greatly, disturb mentally; cause disorder in," from Old French perturber "disturb, confuse" (14c.) and directly from Latin perturbare "to confuse, disorder, disturb," especially of states of the mind, from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + turbare "disturb, confuse," from turba "turmoil, crowd" (see turbid). Related: Perturbed; perturbing.

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disturbance (n.)

late 13c., "mental distress, emotional disorder of the mind, grief," from Old French destorbance (12c., Old North French distorbance), from destourber, from Latin disturbare "throw into disorder," from dis- "completely" (see dis-) + turbare "to disorder, disturb," from turba "turmoil" (see turbid).

Meaning "public disturbance, political agitation" is from c. 1300; that of "violent interruption of peace or unity" is late 14c.; it is the sense in disturbance of the (king's) peace," early 15c.

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molest (v.)

late 14c., molesten, "to cause trouble, grief, or vexation, disturb, harass," from Old French molester "to torment, trouble, bother" (12c.) and directly from Latin molestare "to disturb, trouble, annoy," from molestus "troublesome, annoying, unmanageable," which is perhaps related to moles "mass" (see mole (n.3)) on notion of either "burden" or "barrier." Meaning "sexually assault" is attested by 1950. Related: Molested; molesting.

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stir (v.)

Old English styrian "to stir, move; rouse, agitate, incite, urge" (transitive and intransitive), from Proto-Germanic *sturjan (source also of Middle Dutch stoeren, Dutch storen "to disturb," Old High German storan "to scatter, destroy," German stören "to disturb"), from PIE *(s)twer- (1) "to turn, whirl" (see storm (n.)). Related: Stirred; stirring. Stir-fry (v.) is attested from 1959.

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solicitate (v.)

1540s, from Latin solicitatus, past participle of sollicitare "to disturb, rouse, stimulate, provoke" (see solicit). Related: Solicitated; solicitating.

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perturbate (v.)

"to disturb greatly," 1540s,  from Latin perturbatus "troubled, disturbed, agitated," past participle of perturbare (see perturb).  Related: Perturbated; perturbating. Now rare or obsolete.

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infestation (n.)

early 15c., "a being infested," from Old French infestacion, from Late Latin infestationem (nominative infestatio) "a troubling, a disturbing, a molesting," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin infestare "to attack, disturb" (see infest).

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