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display (v.)

c. 1300, "unfold, spread out, unfurl" (a banner, etc.), from Old French desploiir (Modern French déployer) "unfold, unfasten, spread out" (of knots, sealed letters, etc.), from Latin displicare "to scatter," in Medieval Latin "to unfold," from dis- "un-, apart" (see dis-) + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait").

Properly of sails or flags (and unconnected to play); meaning "reveal, exhibit, expose to view" is late 14c.; sense of "reveal unintentionally, allow to be seen" is from c. 1600. Related: Displayed; displaying.

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display (n.)

1580s, "description," a sense now obsolete, from display (v.). Meaning "exhibition, a spreading of anything to the view," commonly with a suggestion of ostentation or striving for effect, is from 1680s. Meaning "presentation of electronic signals on a screen" is from 1945 in reference to radar, by 1960 of computers. Display-window is attested by 1893.

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splay (v.)
early 14c., "unfold, unfurl;" c. 1400, "to spread out," shortened form of desplayen (see display (v.)). Meaning "to spread out awkwardly" is from 1848. Past participle adjective splayed "spread out" is attested from 1540s.
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*plek- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to plait." It is an extended form of root *pel- (2) "to fold."

It forms all or part of: accomplice; application; apply; complex; complexion; complicate; complication; complicity; deploy; display; duplex; duplicate; duplicity; employ; explicate; explicit; exploit; flax; implex; implicate; implication; implicit; imply; multiply; perplex; perplexity; plait; plash (v.2) "to interlace;" pleat; -plex; plexus; pliable; pliant; plie; plight (n.1) "condition or state;" ply (v.1) "work with, use;" ply (v.2) "to bend; ply (n.) "a layer, fold;" replica; replicate; replication; reply; simplex; splay; triplicate.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit prasna- "turban;" Greek plekein "to plait, braid, wind, twine," plektos "twisted;" Latin plicare "to lay, fold, twist," plectere (past participle plexus) "to plait, braid, intertwine;" Old Church Slavonic plesti "to braid, plait, twist," Russian plesti; Gothic flahta "braid;" Old Norse fletta, Old High German flehtan "to plait;" Old English fleax "cloth made with flax, linen."
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show-off (n.)
1776, "a display;" see show (v.) + off (adv.). From 1801 as "a deliberate and ostentatious display;" in reference to the person who makes such a display, attested from 1924. The verbal phrase is first recorded 1793 as "make a conspicuous and obvious display." Noun showing-off is from 1874.
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ostentation (n.)

mid-15c., ostentacioun, "ambitious display, pretentious show, display intended to evoke admiration or attract attention," from Old French ostentacion (mid-14c.) and directly from Latin ostentationem (nominative ostentatio) "showing, exhibition, vain display," noun of action from past-participle stem of ostentare "to display," frequentative of ostendere "to show" (see ostensible).

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pixelation (n.)

also pixellation, graphics display effect in which individual pixels (small, square single-colored display elements that comprise the image) are visible, 1991, from pixel + -ation.

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pageantry (n.)
"splendid display," 1650s; see pageant + -ry.
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pomp (n.)

c. 1300, "ostentation and display," especially on parade, from Old French pompe "pomp, magnificence" (13c.) and directly from Latin pompa "procession, pomp," from Greek pompē "solemn procession, display, escort," literally "a sending," from pempein "to send," which is of unknown etymology. In Church Latin, used in deprecatory sense for "worldly display, vain show." The meaning "feeling of arrogance and vanity" (usually paired alliteratively with pride) is from early 14c.

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shadow-box (n.)
protective display case, 1892, from shadow (n.) + box (n.1).
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