Etymology
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disgust (n.)
Origin and meaning of disgust

1590s, "repugnance excited by something offensive or loathsome," from French desgoust "strong dislike, repugnance," literally "distaste" (16c., Modern French dégoût), from desgouster "have a distaste for," from des- "opposite of" (see dis-) + gouster "taste," from Latin gustare "to taste" (from PIE root *geus- "to taste; to choose"). The literal sense, "distaste, aversion to the taste of," is from 1610s in English.

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disgust (v.)
Origin and meaning of disgust

c. 1600, "have a strong distaste for or repugnance to," from French desgouster "have a distaste for" (16c.), from desgoust "distaste," also "strong dislike" (see disgust (n.)).

The sense has strengthened over time in English, and subject and object have been reversed; the older use looks like this: "It is not very palatable, which makes some disgust it" (1660s). The reverse sense of "to excite nausea and loathing in" is attested from 1640s. Related: Disgusted; disgusting.

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disgusting (adj.)

"causing disgust, offensive to the taste physically, morally, or aesthetically," 1754, present-participle adjective from disgust (v.). Related: Disgustingly. Disgustful "causing disgust" (1610s) was "Very common in 17-18th c." [OED].

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relish (v.)

1560s (implied in relished), "give flavor to, give an agreeable taste to," from relish (n.). The sense of "to enjoy, like the taste or flavor of, take pleasure in" is from 1590s (compare sense reversals in other similar "taste" verbs: like, please, disgust, etc.). Related: Relishing.

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dislike (v.)

1540s (implied in disliking), "be displeased with, regard with some aversion or displeasure," a hybrid which ousted native mislike as the opposite of like (v.). In common with disgust, it sometimes reversed the direction of its action and meant (in this case) "annoy, vex, displease" (1570s), but this sense is archaic or obsolete. Related: Disliked; disliking. The noun sense of "feeling of being displeased" is from 1590s. English in 16c. also had dislove "hate, cease to love," but it did not survive.

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*geus- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to taste; to choose." It forms words for "taste" in Greek and Latin, but its descendants in Germanic and Celtic mostly mean "try" or "choose." The semantic development could have been in either direction.

It forms all or part of: Angus; choice; choose; degustation; disgust; Fergus; gustation; gustatory; gusto; ragout; Valkyrie.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit jus- "enjoy, be pleased;" Avestan zaosa- "pleasure," Old Persian dauš- "enjoy;" Greek geuesthai "to taste;" Latin gustare "to taste, take a little of;" Old English cosan, cesan, Gothic kausjan "to test, to taste of," Old High German koston "try," German kosten "taste of."
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faugh (interj.)
exclamation of disgust, by 1540s.
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phew 

vocalic gesture originally expressing weariness, disgust, etc., attested from c. 1600.

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taedium vitae 
Latin, "weariness of life; a deep disgust with life tempting one to suicide."
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ugh 

1765, imitative of the sound of a cough; as an interjection of disgust, recorded from 1822. Form ough is from 1560s.

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