Etymology
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disgrace (v.)
Origin and meaning of disgrace

1550s, "disfigure, deprive of (outward) grace," a sense now obsolete; 1590s, "put out of favor, dismiss with discredit," also "bring shame or reproach upon" from French disgracier (16c.), from Italian disgraziare, from disgrazia "misfortune, deformity," from dis- "opposite of" (see dis-) + grazia "grace" (see grace (n.)). Related: Disgraced; disgracing.

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disgrace (n.)
Origin and meaning of disgrace

1580s, "state of being out of favor of one in a powerful or exalted position;" also "cause of shame or reproach;" 1590s, "state of ignominy, dishonor, or shame," from French disgrace (16c.), from Italian disgrazia, from dis- (see dis-) + grazia, from Latin gratia "favor, esteem, regard; pleasing quality, good will, gratitude" (see grace (n.)).

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disgraceful (adj.)

1590s, "graceless," from dis- + graceful; also "full of disgrace, shameful, dishonorable, bringing or deserving shame" (1590s), from disgrace (n.) + -ful. Related: Disgracefully; disgracefulness.

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*gwere- (2)

gwerə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to favor."

It forms all or part of: agree; bard (n.); congratulate; congratulation; disgrace; grace; gracious; grateful; gratify; gratis; gratitude; gratuitous; gratuity; gratulation; ingrate; ingratiate.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit grnati "sings, praises, announces;" Avestan gar- "to praise;" Lithuanian giriu, girti "to praise, celebrate;" Old Celtic bardos "poet, singer."

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shend (n.)
"shame, disgrace" (obsolete or dialectal), Old English scand "ignominy, shame, confusion, disgrace; scandal, disgraceful thing; wretch, impostor, infamous man; bad woman," from the source of Old English scamu "shame" (see shame (n.)) + -þa, with change of -m- to -n- before a dental (compare Old Frisian skande, Dutch schande, Old High German scanda, German Schande "disgrace"). Also in early Modern English as a verb, shend (Old English scendan) "put to shame; blame, reproach; bring to ruin."

It was active in forming compounds, such as shendful (Old English scandful) "shameful," shendship "disgrace;" Old English scandhus "house of ill-fame," scandlic "shameful," scandlufiende "loving shamefully," scandword "obscene language").
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show up (v.)
1826, "to disgrace through exposure," see show (v.) + up (adv.). Meaning "to put in an appearance, be present" is from 1888.
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reproach (n.)

mid-14c., reproche, "a rebuke, blame, censure" directed against a person; also "object of scorn or contempt;" c. 1400, as "disgrace, state of disgrace," from Anglo-French repruce, Old French reproche "blame, shame, disgrace" (12c.), from reprochier "to blame, bring up against."

OED cites Diez for the explanation that this is from Vulgar Latin *repropiare, from Latin re- "opposite of" + prope "near" (see propinquity), with suggestions of "bring near to" as in modern get in (someone's) face. But it points out other etymologists of French would have it from *reprobicare, from Latin reprobus/reprobare "disapprove, reject, condemn" (see reprobate (adj.)).

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shame (n.)

Old English scamu, sceomu "feeling of guilt or disgrace; confusion caused by shame; disgrace, dishonor, insult, loss of esteem or reputation; shameful circumstance, what brings disgrace; modesty; private parts," from Proto-Germanic *skamo (source also of Old Saxon skama, Old Norse skömm, Swedish skam, Old Frisian scome, Dutch schaamte, Old High German scama, German Scham). The best guess is that this is from PIE *skem-, from *kem- "to cover" (covering oneself being a common expression of shame).

Until modern times English had a productive duplicate form in shand. An Old Norse word for it was kinnroði, literally "cheek-redness," hence, "blush of shame." Greek distinguished shame in the bad sense of "disgrace, dishonor" (aiskhyne) from shame in the good sense of "modesty, bashfulness" (aidos). To put (someone or something) to shame is mid-13c. Shame culture attested by 1947.

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villainy (n.)
c. 1200, from Anglo-French vilanie, Old French vilenie "low character, unworthy act, disgrace, degradation," from vilain (see villain).
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baffle (v.)
1540s, "to disgrace," of uncertain origin. Perhaps a Scottish respelling of bauchle "to disgrace publicly" (especially a perjured knight), which is probably related to French bafouer "to abuse, hoodwink" (16c.), possibly from baf, a natural sound of disgust, like bah (compare German baff machen "to flabbergast"). The original sense is obsolete. Meaning "defeat someone's efforts, frustrate by interposing obstacles or difficulties" is from 1670s. Related: Baffled; baffling.
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