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disembark (v.)

1580s, "put on shore, remove from on board a ship to land," also intransitive, "land from a ship, go on shore," from French desembarquer, from des- (see dis-) + embarquer (see embark). Related: Disembarkation; disembarked; disembarking.

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debark (v.1)

"disembark, land from a ship or boat," 1650s, from French débarquer (16c.), from de- (Old French des-; see dis-) + barque "bark" (see bark (n.2)). Compare disembark. Related: Debarked; debarking; debarkation; debarcation.

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land (v.1)
Old English lendan "to bring to land" (transitive), early 13c., from the source of land (n.). Intransitive sense "come to shore, go ashore, disembark" is from c. 1200. Spelling and pronunciation probably were influenced by the noun. Originally of ships; of fish, in the angling sense, from 1610s; hence figurative sense of "to obtain" (a job, etc.), first recorded 1854. Of aircraft, attested from 1916. Related: Landed; landing.
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expound (v.)

mid-14c., expounen, expounden, "to explain or comment on, to reveal the meaning" (of Scripture, etc.), from Old French espondre "expound (on), set forth, explain," from Latin exponere "put forth, expose, exhibit; set on shore, disembark; offer, leave exposed, reveal, publish," from ex "forth" (see ex-) + ponere "to put, place" (see position (n.)); with unetymological -d developing in French (compare sound (n.1)). The usual Middle English form was expoune. General (non-theological) sense of "set forth, reveal, describe or tell" is from late 14c. Related: Expounded; expounding.

'In Englissh,' quod Pacience, 'it is wel hard, wel to expounen, ac somdeel I shal seyen it, by so thow understonde.' ["Piers Plowman," late 14c.]
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