Etymology
Advertisement
discussion (n.)

mid-14c., discussioun, "examination, investigation, judicial trial," from Old French discussion "discussion, examination, investigation, legal trial" and directly from Medieval Latin discussionem (nominative discussio) "examination, discussion," in classical Latin, "a shaking," noun of action from past-participle stem of discutere "strike asunder, break up," in Late Latin and Medieval Latin also "to discuss, examine, investigate," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + quatere "to shake" (see quash).

Meaning "a talking over, debating" in English first recorded mid-15c. Sense evolution in Latin appears to have been from "smash apart" to "scatter, disperse," then in post-classical times (via the mental process involved) to "investigate, examine," then to "debate."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
treaty (n.)
late 14c., "treatment, discussion," from Anglo-French treté, Old French traitié "assembly, agreement, dealings," from Latin tractatus "discussion, handling, management," from tractare "to handle, manage" (see treat (v.)). Sense of "contract or league between nations or sovereigns" is first recorded early 15c.
Related entries & more 
moot (adj.)

"debatable, subject to discussion," by 1650s, from moot case (1570s), earlier simply moot (n.) in the specialized sense "discussion of a hypothetical law case" (1530s) in law student jargon. The reference is to students gathering to test their skills in mock cases.

Related entries & more 
panelist (n.)

1937, "member of a discussion panel," American English, from panel (n.) + -ist. By 1950 in reference to quiz shows.

Related entries & more 
intercommunication (n.)
mid-15c., "discussion, conference," from Anglo-Latin intercommunicationem; see inter- + communication. Attested from 1881 in reference to systems of linked telephones.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
au fait (adj.)
1743, French, "to the point, to the matter under discussion," literally "to the fact," from au "to the" (see au) + fait "fact" (see feat). Used in French with sense of "acquainted with the facts, expert, fully skilled."
Related entries & more 
theodolite (n.)
surveying instrument, 1570s, of unknown origin (see OED for discussion). "The word has a Gr[eek] semblance, but no obvious Gr[eek] basis" [Century Dictionary].
Related entries & more 
drub (v.)

"to beat soundly," 1630s (in an Oriental travel narrative), probably ultimately from Arabic darb "a beating," from daraba "he beat up" (see discussion in OED). Related: Drubbed; drubbing.

Related entries & more 
pnyx (n.)

public place of assembly in ancient Athens, where the people met for the discussion of political affairs of the state, from Greek pnyx, which is probably from pyknos "dense, solid; numerous; packed, crowded," a word of uncertain origin.

Related entries & more 
loach (n.)
small edible European fish, mid-14c., from Old French loche "loach" (13c.), also, in dialect, "slug," a word of unknown origin (see discussion in Gamillscheg).
Related entries & more