Etymology
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dis (v.)

also diss, slang, by 1980, shortening of disrespect or dismiss, originally in African-American vernacular, popularized by hip hop. Related: Dissed; dissing. Earlier it was short for distribute in late 19c. printers' slang and for disconnected in the telephone-line sense, and in this sense it was given a slang figurative extension as "weak in the head" (1925).

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Dis 
Roman underworld god, from Latin Dis, contracted from dives "rich," which is related to divus "divine, god" (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine," in derivatives "sky, heaven, god"), hence "favored by god." Compare Pluto and Old Church Slavonic bogatu "rich," from bogu "god."
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dis- 
Origin and meaning of dis-

word-forming element of Latin origin meaning 1. "lack of, not" (as in dishonest); 2. "opposite of, do the opposite of" (as in disallow); 3. "apart, away" (as in discard), from Old French des- or directly from Latin dis- "apart, asunder, in a different direction, between," figuratively "not, un-," also "exceedingly, utterly." Assimilated as dif- before -f- and to di- before most voiced consonants.

The Latin prefix is from PIE *dis- "apart, asunder" (source also of Old English te-, Old Saxon ti-, Old High German ze-, German zer-). The PIE root is a secondary form of *dwis- and thus is related to Latin bis "twice" (originally *dvis) and to duo, on notion of "two ways, in twain" (hence "apart, asunder").

In classical Latin, dis- paralleled de- and had much the same meaning, but in Late Latin dis- came to be the favored form and this passed into Old French as des-, the form used for compound words formed in Old French, where it increasingly had a privative sense ("not"). In English, many of these words eventually were altered back to dis-, while in French many have been altered back to de-. The usual confusion prevails.

As a living prefix in English, it reverses or negatives what it is affixed to. Sometimes, as in Italian, it is reduced to s- (as in spend, splay, sport, sdain for disdain, and the surnames Spencer and Spence).

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disinterest (n.)

"impartiality," 1650s, from dis- "opposite of" + interest (n.).

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discourteous (adj.)

"uncivil, rude," 1570s; see dis- + courteous. Related: Discourteously; discourteousness.

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disharmony (n.)

"discord, incongruity, want of harmony," c. 1600; see dis- + harmony.

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disrespect (n.)

"want of respect or reverence, incivility," 1630s, from dis- + respect (n.).

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disunity (n.)

"want of unity, state of separation; absence of accord," 1630s, from dis- + unity.

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disrespectful (adj.)

"showing disrespect, wanting in respect; irreverent, uncivil," 1670s; see dis- + respectful. Related: Disrespectfully; disrespectfulness.

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disallowable (adj.)

"not to be sanctioned or permitted, inadmissible," mid-15c., from dis- "not, reverse of" + allowable.

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